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Discussion Starter #1
This is a hypothetical question directed at those of you out there who do or did make a living primarily as a performer, whether as a leader, sideman, studio musician, or anything like that. I'm just wondering if any of you made the choice early on to take gigs in a kind of genre/band/environment that wouldn't have been your *first choice*, and then had it take off to the point where you felt like it would be a risk pursuing your preferred style of music. For example a hardcore jazzer who started taking pop/rock gigs as a sideman and then was very successful at that to the point where they no longer felt they could *make it* in the jazz scene (insert whatever genres you want). Does that kind of thing happen often? Is it a problem or are you just happy to be making money playing music? Do you have time for your own stuff on the side? I'm just trying to get a feel for what people's experiences have been, since not everyone has a career where they totally call the shots about what kind of music they play.

A related question - at what point in your career do you turn down gigs simply because you don't like the kind of music you are asked to play (or is there even such a point)?

hope this makes sense haha[rolleyes]
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I gave up pursuing a career as a jazz musician when I discovered two things. First that I couldn't play fast enough and second that there is hardly a career in it anyway. I was happy to make a living playing music when I was young, but it didn't take long to realise I was happiest playing and learning about blues and rock & roll, though I found I could learn something, and enjoy that learning, from more or less any style of music bar none.

So it wasn't just a question of being happy making money playing music, it was a question of enjoying and learning about all forms of music.

At one stage I was able to turn down gigs, but it was not usually based on a genre, it would more likely be based on not enjoying working with the particular people on a gig, be they players or management.
 

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A related question - at what point in your career do you turn down gigs simply because you don't like the kind of music you are asked to play (or is there even such a point)?
I'm not sure what I do musically qualifies as a 'career' although over the past few years, the little money I make at it has become a considerable part of my income (which is simply to say I'm a long ways from being rich). With that caveat, there was never a point at which I accepted gigs where I would have to play the kind of music I don't like. That was never on the radar for me.

I only play the music I like. Just yet another reason, among many, that I'll never be rich!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm not sure what I do musically qualifies as a 'career' although over the past few years, the little money I make at it has become a considerable part of my income (which is simply to say I'm a long ways from being rich). With that caveat, there was never a point at which I accepted gigs where I would have to play the kind of music I don't like. That was never on the radar for me.

I only play the music I like. Just yet another reason, among many, that I'll never be rich!
Haha, yeah there's always that way to go about it.
 
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