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Recently i've been reading many posts where people explains how their sax necks got pulled down.
It haven't happened to me but i'm gettin' a bit paranoic about it.
What should i do to prevent it?.Some tips?.
 

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Don't pull down on your neck?

I've never had this problem, but I suppose many people might do it by forcing a piece on to a tenor neck. I know some folks put their mouthpiece on the neck before putting the neck on the horn to make sure.
 

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I always use my left hand to insert the neck ,while at the same time pushing up just under the mouthpiece(whether the mouthpiece is on,or not)with my right thumb

i place the neck this way without exception
 

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I hear that happens but in 32 years of playing sax never to me. B
 

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... and then there was a "too cool" young clinician that I observed at the Reno Jazz Festival a few years ago. While talking to the high school students in the sax clinic, he'd LEAN on the neck of his Mk VI tenor! Arghhhh. I wanted to raise my hand and ... Well I never came up with something nice to say about it that wouldn't make him look like the idiot he is/was.

Bottom line: As Hak' noted, don't pull down. Also be aware that "pull-down" may result from pushing down.
 

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Just to clarify (since the forum won't let me edit): While talking to the high school students in the sax clinic, he'd take off his horn, set the bow on the floor, and LEAN on the neck of his Mk VI tenor! Yes, leaned on the horn like an ol' cane.

Don't do it. If you need to be cool, wear sunglasses.

If you really want to impress a room of young musicians, learn to play your horn.
 

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I always use my left hand to insert the neck ,while at the same time pushing up just under the mouthpiece(whether the mouthpiece is on,or not)with my right thumb

i place the neck this way without exception
Why?

How long have you been playing?
 

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put the mouthpiece on the neck before attaching it to your horn ...no pulldown. Only adjust it on your horn.
 

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This thread recalled an almost forgotten incident where my MkVI fell off the stage (must've been about 1972 I reckon) and landed on the neck. It was bent down quite a long way. Being young and not realising how "sacred" MkVIs were to become, I just gently pushed it back into place and carried on playing. There was no noticable deformation of the neck - no bulges or kinks. Lucky I guess.

A friend dropped his trumpet from the same dodgy stage (it had this wobbly, pull out section on castors) and rammed the mouthpiece home. For ages, perhaps a year?, he carried it around with the piece sticking out of the end of the case and one latch left undone.
 

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Pull down that I've seen has nothing to do with cork grease or how you put on the mp. It's damage caused by the sax falling out off the stand, falling off the stage, falling off the bleachers type of damage. If you are the original owner of your horn and take good care of it, it's not a problem. If your the 2nd-50th owner, you might look close at your neck.

There's a couple types of "pull down". The most common is a "crease at the crook." That's where the neck is ovoid at some point (from being pulled down), usually at the apex of the stack-to-mp bend.

It also creates neck tenon issues. A good yank on the neck can also create an ovoid tenon. When you need a tenon fix, it's usually not loose in all directions. It's loose front to back, but when you turn the neck sideways and wiggle it, there's no play. That tells you that the force loosening the tenon has been fore and aft, i.e., pull down.

Another problem is where the neck brace is intended to strengthen the bend in the neck. A brace can cause a "punch in" at either end of the brace at the point where it connects to the neck. I've seen cases where the brace actually punched in enough to split the neck solder and cause a leak in the neck (necks are soldered on the inside of the bend where the braces are soldered on top).

Another "bend down" isn't down at all. The sax can take a fall that hits the neck sideways and puts a twist in it. It doesn't appear pulled down, but there's an ovoid shape to the neck that twists off to the side. This one is actually harder to see than a straight pull down, but you still have the ovoid cross-section and it's tonal problems.

One way to diagnose these issues is to put various ball bearing in the neck followed by a "leak" light. Sight down the neck and be amazed at how far from "round" the neck is. Neck pull down, pull up, pull sideway, pull on my finger. I'd guess pull down is much more common than players would think.

Mark
 

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I have seen this a few times. On newer necks especially it can be caused by excess downward pressure on the mouthpiece while playing. OR when putting on the mouthpiece.

I see no benefit to whether one chooses to put the mouthpiece on the neck before or after it is attached to the saxophone, only where one holds the neck when doing so. Especially on tenor if one holds the back of the neck (the part in-line with the body of the saxophone) there can be unintended up/downward pressure as one pushes the mouthpiece on. Instead hold neck just behind the cork, there is no room to bend the neck up or down, some people do find this easier with the neck off, in which case do it that way. Also people push the neck in from the front, also not with direct pressure from above on the "straight" part of the neck heading into the body of the instrument.

As always cork grease will decrease the likely hood of any of this happening, if one has trouble getting the neck into the saxophone perhaps a cleaning of the neck tenon area would be in order.

If the only thing that happend when a saxophone fell off even a stand is a bent neck they should consider themselves lucky. Once a neck bends like this it's tonal characteristics are almost never the same, nor its tuning.
 

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Put the mouthpiece on the neck before you put the neck on the horn.

When adjusting the mouthpiece on the neck, grab the neck with your other hand just after the cork to stablize it.

Don't drink and adjust your neck while falling off the stage.
Don't use your sax for a cane (or a ladder).

HTH


Just common sense stuff.
 
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