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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old King tweed tenor case.
I would like to apply a protective coating to the outside.

If I lacquered it, or coated it in polyurethane, would it crack and flake off?

Maybe shellac and then polyurethane?
( works great in furniture refinishing, especially pine)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Were the outside of these cases originally factory varnished or lacquered?

The inside seam of the case shows signs of a shiny substance.

Has anyone lacquered or polyurethaned theirs?
I don't want to just go ahead and then have it crumble later.
 

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Pigmented polyester resin w/ any proper thickener won't yellow... Ha! & certainly ain't brittle... Standard everyday yacht building techniques here...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm only worried about it flaking off.
The tweed is yellow anyway.

euge, the finish on your case, although not tweed, doesn't appear to have cracked or flaked off?

I'm not doing resin though.
 

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Years of banging around in cars trunks 'wore' off some edges... I actually got this 6M alto about 12 years ago 'with' this case, so this is a 20 yr +? resin job & I just happen to be accomplished in those crafts and recognize what was done as a procedure...
 

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yeah.....it should be fine.... otherwise you can do what has been used for years...which is a cover!!!! ive got one if you need it!
 

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Maybe shellac and then polyurethane?
( works great in furniture refinishing, especially pine)
Only if its the de-waxed version (blonde), otherwise the lacquer wont adhere unless you put a silicone additive in it.
 

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Tweed-era Fender amps were shot with lacquer and it remains the way to go for replica guitar amplifier cabinets.
 

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:)
I have an old King tweed tenor case.
I would like to apply a protective coating to the outside.

If I lacquered it, or coated it in polyurethane, would it crack and flake off?

Maybe shellac and then polyurethane?
( works great in furniture refinishing, especially pine)[/QUOTE

If you must do it, I would say forget about the lacquer or polyurethane. shellac might be better, but you do have to hope for the best and prepare for the worst. it is because I think none of them will work well.:):)
 

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Go for the cover! Your case has survived 50 years. If it ain't broke etc., etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you Dr. G
PM on the way.
 

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There are vintage style guitar cases with tweed outer covering, but I'm not sure what they're coated with. The fabric would be coated well before it became the case covering.

For practical purposes, have a zip-up canvas outer case cover made to fit over your existing case. Not only does it protect the case, it also ensures the latches don't get strained and you can have a pocket on the lid to keep all manner of bits in (eg. sax stand, music stand, etc.) so keeping everything you need in the one case so you've still got a hand free for opening doors or carrying other instruments with. I had one made to fit my Yamaha 875EX alto case and before that I had one specially made for my YAS-62 case which had black fur lining which insulated it. You can have D-rings for a shoulder strap fitted to the case cover as well.

And if you forget to take your sling off after everything else has been packed up, you can pop it into the zip up lid pocket instead of having to undo the lot to put it back in the case.
 

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There are vintage style guitar cases with tweed outer covering, but I'm not sure what they're coated with. The fabric would be coated well before it became the case covering.
Amplifiers are covered with tweed cloth and then lacquered - lacquered cloth would not bend around corners and edges.

Here's one example procedure that pops up in Google:

http://www.ehow.com/how_8670994_lacquer-tweed-guitar-amp-speaker.html

This amp was done with MinWax Honey pine urethane:

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Minwax were my go to products for furniture refinishing.
Their stain produces amazing results.

I'll take your advice G and go for the lacquer.
I am surprised that no one has responded, who has actually done this to rejuvenate a tweed case.

The case will see near zero "out" time.
I just like how it looks.

Thank you all for responding.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
hmm -been reading a bunch of refinish jobs of tweed amps, most go with just shellac.

I have zero experience with lacquer and it sounds like a possible nightmare.

May go with what I know, a couple of shellac coats and then polyurethane, for the beauty seal.

I know the expected results are pleasing, from my furniture refinishing days.
The tweed will need the sealant property of the shellac.

Just make sure to rub down the shellac coats with 0000 steel wool before applying the poly,
which can also then be rubbed down with 0000 steel wool between coats.
Finish to taste, of course.

I'll revisit this thread when my project is tackled.
 

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Shellacs advantage over other sealers is the fact it can be applied waifer thin, less than 0.0005" for multiple layers when applied via french polishing method, in waifer thin applications its actually quite flexible. It can also be coloured, we use it reguarly on violins.

Minwax is also an excellent product as well for coating. I use minwax on picture frames furniture etc.. But Ive never mixed these two together, as mentioned above if spraying use a blonde shellac version
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, I refinished both tenor cases, a month ago.

For the King '46 tweed case I chose Minwax Zinner amber colored shellac, (big mistake),
and then, sealed it with Minwax polyurethane.
The "amber" shellac turned out super dark, not orange as I had thought.

If you want to retain the blondish hue to the tweed, choose the lighter shellac.

Result: The stench is still present, and I have been airing the case outside, for weeks.

Both the shellac, and then the polyurethane, soaked in like gangbusters!!
Nothing like furniture refinishing. The tweed was super thirsty.
Plus, you can't really rub it down with 0000 steel wool.

The cost was super expensive, about $40, effin' ridiculous.
The tweed just sucked up about a quart each of shellac and polyurethane, unbelievably so.


I should have taken Dr. G's recommendation of lacquer,
that I opted for on the second King '48 tenor case.
It is covered in a tweed like cloth.

I chose brush on lacquer only for the second case, rather than spray, to avoid the fumes as much as possible.
One or two coats. The results are stellar. Hard, glossy, protective finish.
Cost: $16

I brushed it on over the leather trim and metal parts too.No brush strokes visible..
Used a 1 1/2" nylon bristle brush.
A few days airing outside, and Bob's yer uncle.

Hope this helps some future vintage case nuts.

Conclusion:
F the shellac & polyurethane - go for the lacquer.
 

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I chose brush on lacquer only for the second case, …The results are stellar.
That's good news. I have restored lots of old cases but none were tweed. I would suggest the following if anyone uses lacquer. Before painting the lacquer, brush the outside of the case with a light coat lacquer thinner (don't put this on leather). This will clean the tweed and prime it for the lacquer, making it adhere better. You may also want to mix in a bit of thinner to the lacquer, especially if it is thick lacquer. After you're done, the thinner will also help with clean up.
 
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