Sax on the Web Forum banner
81 - 91 of 91 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned hiring security, like maybe the Hell's Angels.
I was hired for a gig one time at a club house. We ended up way out in the middle of nowhere, in the middle of the night, on an Indian reservation. Being that we were the only non-Indians, I was a little bit nervous. I looked around the room to find the biggest, most bad-assed dude there and before we even set up I walked straight up to him and made friends. I bought him a beer, shot the breeze with him and asked him if he would help us out by acting as security for the band. That dude stood right next to the stage with a couple of his friends and looked after us for the entire gig.

Just FYI - In the years since then, I have played numerous times for private parties on the Indian reservations in my area and have always been treated warmly, graciously and with respect. I've also been well fed!

Fortunately, I have never had a horn stolen (knock on wood). I'm not saying it can't happen though. I keep an eye on them and use common sense but I'm not overly paranoid. I take my best horns to the gig and not "B" level horns. I can't see any reason to have them if I'm only going to play them in my living room.

There were a few times when I was younger and was working some pretty tough places that I packed a gun, but it wasn't to protect my horns it was to protect my life, if need be. I never had to pull it out, fortunately. As mentioned, I also think keeping situational awareness is probably the most important thing. If you're working in a club or even a casual venue, make friends with the bartenders, waitresses (and tip them well) and get to know the security people. It pays to have allies and other sets of eyes on your gear. If you get in a situation, look 'em in the eye, don't be aggressive, but don't show fear either...ever.

That's all I've got!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
On any gig I do a sound check and leave my stand, mic, etc. but always (repeat always) pack up my horns and take them with me. Worst case is I rush on stage before the first set and put my horns together before the first song at least the were not just hanging out on stage with the invitation to be stolen or even knocked over by the band or sound guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
This is an interesting thread.

When I lived and worked in New Orleans (pre-Katrina) stage security was never a problem. The sound man usually kept watch over the stage (depending upon the size of the venue).

New Orleans was (and still is) a poverty-stricken city, but the concern over equipment security wasn't a big deal (and I worked in some of the roughest places imaginable in and around the city).

I live in a much more affluent (and relatively "younger") city. Though I am much less active than I was twenty-five years ago, the musicians that I know who are active (3-5 nights per week) are quite paranoid about their equipment. Axe and equipment theft seems to be an issue of great concern, even in the major hotels and concert venues. It could have something to do with the culture. In New Orleans, everyone I knew was a musician or had a musician in his family. One in six families had a piano in the house. (This is the '80's and the figure comes from an estimate from a local piano tuner whose name , at the moment, I can't recall. Sherman Somebody). Every bar that hosted live music had an acoustic piano. (Of course no one would attempt to steal a piano between sets). Some of the musicians that I knew were junkies, and a lot of the hangers-on were junkies. My point is that musicians were regarded a bit differently in New Orleans at that time, and probably garnered a bit more respect there. I could be wrong.

That doesn't mean that people didn't watch their equipment. They did. Horn and guitar players didn't put their instruments in the trunks of their cars until they were ready to go home.

The great paranoia over axe and equipment loss in a venue in New Orleans at that time wasn't as great as it is now in my current new city of steel, glass, and granite and marble veneers.

To be fair, I must note that recent visits to post-Katrina New Orleans left me with a really unfavorable impression of the city. The city is rife with crime and its problems compare to the problems of Detroit, MI now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,437 Posts
Just last week a guy came up to me at a gig and asked, “Is that really a Balanced Action tenor?”
I turned to the keyboard player and told him this is why you see me sometimes with a Japanese sax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
On any gig I do a sound check and leave my stand, mic, etc. but always (repeat always) pack up my horns and take them with me. Worst case is I rush on stage before the first set and put my horns together before the first song at least the were not just hanging out on stage with the invitation to be stolen or even knocked over by the band or sound guys.
Slight tangent here, but in terms of absolute risk, getting knocked over by all sorts of clueless people is much bigger. Yes, its not GONE but it is a big concern.

My guitar player walked in last night, and immediately, I mean the very first thing he did was get a mic cord around his ankle and was about to trip or knock it over or both. Many people are completely clueless about their physical world...in so many ways.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
34,992 Posts
Just last week a guy came up to me at a gig and asked, "Is that really a Balanced Action tenor?"
I turned to the keyboard player and told him this is why you see me sometimes with a Japanese sax.
OK, why? Because you are offended by others geeking out on your gear, or because you perceive a threat of theft?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,956 Posts
Yeah, I've had some close calls. Had to jump out of the way a few times. And I did watch a fellow sax player right next to me get his horn pushed into his teeth. Luckily he only suffered a cut lip and the horn was ok, but it could have turned out much worse.
Same thing happened to me and my front teeth were a bit shaky for about 2-3 days but luckily no permanent damage to me or horn. It's either that or the guitar/bass player gets the urge for an impersonation of Jimi Hendrix and hits you with the neck of his instrument right in the face ... And it is always the guy who can't stop noodling his umpth repetition of his improvisation.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,758 Posts
Civilians know too much with the inter web thing they have now.
I've had a mint SBA stolen. I know what it feels like to have a prized tool taken.
I think this is probably a good point. Pre-internet days I never worried too much about anyone being tempted to make off with my ratty-looking MKVI with half its lacquer missing, assuming, and rightly so back then anyway, that they had no idea it was worth enough to be worth stealing. But then again, it only takes one knowledgeable thief...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
34,992 Posts
Civilians know too much with the inter web thing they have now.
I've had a mint SBA stolen. I know what it feels like to have a prized tool taken.
My Mk VI sop was stolen years ago - along with my Teac 3440 and a target pistol.

I, too, have become cautious about talking gear with strangers in clubs.
 
81 - 91 of 91 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top