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Since I'm going to be sticking with a piece that has a larger shank than my previous one, I decided to recork my bari neck two weeks ago. Two things conspired to ruin my hard work: A. The Ponzol piece I'm using is long and heavy, and it you can see it sits pretty far out on the cork. 2. I had to use thick cork to get it up to the right size.

Does anybody ever build up a neck with more solid material, like plastic, under thin cork? That would probably help the situation. If so, what have you used?

On a related note, any of you machinists want to help me out? I'd like to make an extension for the mouthpiece, maybe from Delrin rod. Something simple where I can slip the moutpiece in one end, and the other end's I.D. matches the mouthpiece's, to give it about an extra 3/4" or so in length.
 

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Does anybody ever build up a neck with more solid material, like plastic, under thin cork? That would probably help the situation. If so, what have you used?
Yes, for both neck corks and tenon corks, if a relatively thick natural cork is borderline or too thin, I sometimes put a layer of rubber cork (aka tech cork, aka gumi cork), which is much harder and doesn't compress nearly as much as natural cork. Then I cork normally with natural cork on top of it.

The mouthpiece shank extension is a good idea and is done occasionally in this situation.
 

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nice idea to put two different types of cork when a certain thickness is required . I find that this problem comes up rather often with older horns and in particular with baritones when matched to modern mouthpieces. Some people do have necks extension made, which is a rather radical and crude solution, but the idea of a shank extension for the specific offending mouthpiece seems to be a neat solution addressing both the problems of the extra length needed and the thickness of the cork (because you will then need a thinner cork)
 

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Two layers of cork is a common repair practice, Im not being specific to saxes,example for recorking recorder tenons, I use two layers. it is a tight radius and too thick of a piece of cork to shape manipulate hammer to get it to sit correctly

The neck extension would be a very simplistic thing to make up. take a machinist 10 - 15 minutes, find a local machine shop or repairer with a lathe and see if you can sweet talk them
 

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I'm not sure I understand why the cork compressing is a problem. Is it the fact that the mouthpiece is unstable that far out on the cork? If that is the situation, you could also use the idea used to tighten worn clarinet middle joint tenons, and that is replace the ferrule at the end of the neck with one that matches the interior diameter of the mouthpiece shank. The downside would be that a mouthpiece with a narrower shank would not work on that neck.
 

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Sounds like the OP wants something that "bounces back" since he's switching between pieces with notably different shank diameters.
 

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No, I wanted to see what people used to bring up the neck size without using thicker cork. I thought by using a firm layer of something under a thin layer of cork, I could get rid of the wobble that's comes about once the new thick cork broke in a bit.
 

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Sounds like the OP wants something that "bounces back" since he's switching between pieces with notably different shank diameters.
I'd like to know about a material with "memory." I switch between modern pieces and stock barrel chambers on '20s-40s era horns. Corks that fit the stock pieces will always be too loose with the modern ones. Putting paper under the piece works, but it's a PITA.
 

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Kraus makes a synthetic cork that has memory, so you can switch between mouthpieces of varying shank diameter and have them all fit every time. It has drawbacks (special care, only certain types of cork grease can be used) so its not for everyday situations, but if you are switching back and forth it does the job admirably.

http://krausmusic.com/sheets/shtsynth.htm#1176

Kraus ONLY sells to music businesses and their terms are a bit more ornery than most, so you'll have to have your tech get it for you.
 

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No, I wanted to see what people used to bring up the neck size without using thicker cork. I thought by using a firm layer of something under a thin layer of cork, I could get rid of the wobble that's comes about once the new thick cork broke in a bit.
The wobble is not caused by the cork compressing per se. It is because there is a gap between the front of the neck and the inside of the shank of the mouthpiece. See the photo of a cut-away mouthpiece below.

Adding to the ring at the end of the neck to bring it up to the I.D. of the mouthpiece shank would eliminate about 80 - 90% of the wobble without having to extend the shank of the mouthpiece.
 

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I'd like to know about a material with "memory." I switch between modern pieces and stock barrel chambers on '20s-40s era horns. Corks that fit the stock pieces will always be too loose with the modern ones. Putting paper under the piece works, but it's a PITA.
The most practical solution I have found short of buying two different necks is to "paint" the interior of the shank of the larger diameter mouthpiece with clear nail polish until it is the same dimension as the smaller one. This can be easily removed using nail polish remover.
 

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That's ok. Most things, and people, with a memory are ornery. I know I am.
 

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CAN mouthpiece bores be reduced so that its smaller? I have a mouthpiece id like to use sometimes, but its bore (where the neck enters) is too big so i have to over crush the cork to use this piece.
 

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CAN mouthpiece bores be reduced so that its smaller?
You would be better of opening up the other mouthpiece, to bring the bore in would require machining a socket and fitting a replacement piece of material inside and then turning the replacment piece to fit..

I thought by using a firm layer of something under a thin layer of cork, I could get rid of the wobble that's comes about once the new thick cork broke in a bit.
Wobble occurs from insufficent surface area contacting an object. In your case it appears the cork is inadequate to maintain the compressed shape, or your cork on the sax neck has been fitted and sanded at the same geometry as the neck and has not been sanded to create a more uniform shape comparable to that of the inside of the mouthpiece.

There was an article recently in the last 2 weeks that Gordon wrote regarding this exact situation
 

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Discussion Starter #16
There was nothing wrong with the cork after I sanded it other than it's being too thick, and getting squished. The mouthpiece fit great for the first week or so.
 

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Does anybody ever build up a neck with more solid material, like plastic, under thin cork?.....
Yes. Exactly as Clarnibass suggested. Laminate natural cork over agglomerated cork (aka..... as listed). That will greatly reduce wobble when the mouthpiece goes on only a short distance.

Normally that left section of cork is used, making for a longer cylinder of cork used. Normally that is ample to make a mouthpiece stable. However pulled out that far, you are losing that stability offered by cork length. JBT's suggestion is not silly.

BTW:

1. Are you leaving the mouthpiece assembled for long periods when the sax is not being used. Normally cork will almost completely revert to its original geometry after a few hours of not being compressed.
2. Are you using a decent cork grease, such as Alisyn? If so, then your cork can probably be a bit larger in diameter, hence firmer, while still easy to assemble.
3. Yes, the firm fit at the "open" end of the cork, as has been mentioned, is important. This means making the outside of the cork cylindrical rather than following the taper of the neck, as Simso mentioned I wrote about....
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?158271-Fitting-Sax-Neck-Corks
 
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