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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have owned a Cannonball Big Bell Alto for over a year and I love it except for one problem, for some reason its hard for me to play the low C, B, and Bb. I don't think its me because I can easily play those notes on my Yamaha student model. Any thoughts?
 

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try this, put you plastic mp cap down the bell....., sometimes this takes care of that problem for me....and it's a cheap way to tell if it's a leak or not.....
 

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However if it is a leak, it will more than likely be near the top. What is your overall set up?
Horn/mouthpiece/reed/ligarture? If it is a wide tip opening then you may have problems playing low.
 

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Sounds like a leak in the low C pad, and I am willing to pu money on that
 

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I have a Raven Stone Series and it has a wonderfully easy temperment. It blows like nothing else I've played in my limited experience. Picked it over a ref. 54. Sorry Slemer guys!
 

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You most likely have a leak. If you can drop a small light down the tube with the neck off and look closely, you'll see it. Use a small Mag-lite with the head off or something. If you go to see the local repairman (-woman:) they will be able to tell you in a few minutes.

Good luck
OsloSax
 

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Problems in the low end bow and bell notes are usually traceable to a leak in the horn nine times out of ten, as others have noted.

A well sealing horn will play easily top to bottom provided your chops and mouthpiece setup up are also up to snuff, which is why a good adjustment and tuneup of the horn is worth it's weight in gold.

The cork or mouthpiece cap in the bell trick is particularly helpful for certain peculiar issues that seem inherent with split bell key horns.
 

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saxismyaxe said:
Problems in the low end bow and bell notes are usually traceable to a leak in the horn nine times out of ten, as others have noted.

A well sealing horn will play easily top to bottom provided your chops and mouthpiece setup up are also up to snuff, which is why a good adjustment and tuneup of the horn is worth it's weight in gold.

The cork or mouthpiece cap in the bell trick is particularly helpful for certain peculiar issues that seem inherent with split bell key horns.
However since it is a Modern horn, I don't think that it seems likely that it is the split bell problem. I think we still need to know what moutphiece/reed combo you are using. Wide moutphiece could be the problem as well, espicially if you are using a strong reed. I'd say take it to the tech, or get a light. If their is not a leak then it could be the mouthpiece and reed combo. :cool: :D
 

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Hi Carbs,

That wasn't suggested as a possible answer to this chap's problem by me, a leak was. It was in fact a response to the suggestion of putting a mouthpiece cap in the bell posted earlier.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I'll take it to a repairman and see if it has any leaks.
As to my Setup:
1. CAM 5 Tip openening (the mouthpiece it came with)
2. Vandoren Optimum ligature
3. Vandoren 2.5 classic reeds
 

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This can often be a venting of the G# key not being regulated correctly. Try fingering a low D and playing it quietly sub-tone. While holding the note, press the G# lever. If the note cracks or changes in "color" then the G# is not being held closed correctly by the F key bridge. Since the G# key is activated by the articulated B and Bb and it can also be "blown open" while playing low C, it's worth checking. If so, you can adjust that bridge carefully and possibly make it work, but don't go too far or you'll throw off the F key.

Hope this helps.

Peace,
John
 
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