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Discussion Starter #1
hi all. i'm self taught and have minimal note reading capacibility. i'm using a yts 52 that's just been repadded.
i have this problem with the 2nd octave G. it seems to shriek when i blow on it half of the time.
what i do is i correct my lower lip to be more flat on the table of the reed. it does seem to reduce the shrieking.

i dont have this particular issue on the soprano or the alto. and it only happens on this key.
before the yts 52, i had a selmer signet tenor. and i had the same issue. do i need to have a professional look
at my embouchure? or is there really a correction once you get to G2 on the tenor sax?

any tips are appreciated. thanks.
 

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Did you have this problem before repadding? If not, then you probably have a small leak present. Consider taking it back to the tech.
 

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Assuming the tech did good work, and given you had a similar issue with your last tenor, look into a reed change. Too soft and flexible a reed would do this, especially at G-G#.
 

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OP says same problem on a different horn. Sounds like an embouchure and air control problem. Could be wrong reed strength too. Fastest way to a solution would be to take a lesson with someone qualified who probably could sort you embouchure in a couple of sessions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OP says same problem on a different horn. Sounds like an embouchure and air control problem. Could be wrong reed strength too. Fastest way to a solution would be to take a lesson with someone qualified who probably could sort you embouchure in a couple of sessions.
thanks. this is what i plan to do.
 

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I'm mainly an alto player and when I began playing tenor I had a similar issue -2nd octave G wanted to jump to D (the twelfth of the fundamental G). I could sort it by paying attention to my breath control.
 

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Also consider the way you assemble the horn. The neck vent could be opening on G on multiple horns if the neck is rotated too far one way or the other. Make sure the octave mechanism on the neck is centered where it meets the octave key on the body, and confirm that the neck vent is fully closed on high G, but opens on high A.

In my experience, trouble with just one note in an easy range of the horn is typically due to a leak.

Can you better describe this "shriek"? Is it a squeak? Is it some other note higher/lower than G? Do F and A sound ok? How about G#?
 

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There is usually a common thread to all of these "My G2 sounds bad" posts... usually it's people who are beginning or self-taught. I had the issue 10+ years ago so I can smell my own.

The issue is 9/10 times caused by bad/too tight embouchure combined with not enough proper breath support. The other 1/10 time is because it's a bad mouthpiece/horn match. I would be surprised if someone else had this problem with your horn, if you give it to someone who's been playing a long time to try out.

My advice is to get a teacher. You also don't mention the mouthpiece (brand, model, tip opening) and reed you're using (brand, model, strength).
 

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I had it happen when I switched from Alto to tenor 14 years ago. I remember it like it was yesterday.

I had been playing alto for 6 years and never took note of that problem until I switched to tenor.

It went away within a week of practicing.

Came back when I bought a different mouthpiece.

Went away within a week of practicing.
 

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I had this problem using Hahn synthetic reeds 2.5 and 3. Only on the G not the G#. The mouthpiece was a metal Berg. I changed to Green box Javas and the problem went away. So in my case it was the reed.
 

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A quick way to check whether the octave mechanism is somehow involved is to finger G and then hit the thumb octave key hard several times while watching the neck keycup. If it is in good adjustment, the neck keycup will not move or bounce. If it does, there needs to be more space between the "post" that extends from the top of the sax and the "loop" from the octave keycup. 1/16" is a typical spacing.

As was mentioned in a previous thread sometimes the high G wants to overblow to the palm D above. This tends to be more common on tenor for some reason. It is basically a voicing issue just like learning to play overtones. I would play high G with the same shape inside the mouth as if singing "AHH" and then switch to the shape produced when singing "EE" in which the back of the tongue goes up. When doing this try to deliberately make the high G fingering sound the D a fifth above. When one can play either note at will the problem will be solved.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the response.
i cant describe the shriek. maybe i'll do a video on it. i'm not sure on the G# but A and F are okay.
i'm using a yts 52 with a Robusto 7* and Vandoren Traditional 2.0 reeds. however i've had this issue on another mouthpiece last year when i was playing tenor also.
i'm thinking and experimenting and it might be on how much of the mouthpiece and reed im taking in. i find that if the reed inside my mouth touches more of my lower lip,
wherein i have to tip the bottom of the sax forward, i tend to have less of these shrieks. so this morning i took a little less of the mouthpiece but it's not working out that
much. will do more test/experiment later as i had to rush to work.

@buddy lee - sounds like a good idea
@saxoclese - i think i need to check that octave mechanism.
 

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thanks for the response.
i cant describe the shriek. maybe i'll do a video on it. i'm not sure on the G# but A and F are okay.
i'm using a yts 52 with a Robusto 7* and Vandoren Traditional 2.0 reeds. however i've had this issue on another mouthpiece last year when i was playing tenor also.
i'm thinking and experimenting and it might be on how much of the mouthpiece and reed im taking in. i find that if the reed inside my mouth touches more of my lower lip,
wherein i have to tip the bottom of the sax forward, i tend to have less of these shrieks. so this morning i took a little less of the mouthpiece but it's not working out that
much. will do more test/experiment later as i had to rush to work.

@buddy lee - sounds like a good idea
@saxoclese - i think i need to check that octave mechanism.
Don't forget your air support -if you focus exclusively on your embouchure, you will neglect this aspect.
 

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Good point. I had just about every other rock/blues/funk sax player rave to high heaven about the Bobby Dukoff with the high baffle. Try as I might, I never got a doggone thing except "accidental altissimo." Ouch! I happily went back to my Berg with the #3 (giant) chamber, the roll-off baffle and a very wide facing (usually 115 for a tenor.) That's about the equivalent of an otto link #9 or 10. It gave me the power I needed to compete properly with electric guitars and bashing drums.
 
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