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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been learing for about 6 months on a Jupiter student model. I've never had any probs with the Jupiter. Now I just got a used YAS-62 on Ebay.
It needed some work, so I took it to my tech and he checked it through, did some small repairs and set it up for me. So, mechanically it is fine.

Now I´ve got it home and I'm having a couple of small problems:
1. When slurring up from middle C :space3: to middle D :line4: , it (almost) always jumps up to high A :line6: .
Funnily enough, if I tongue the D its always clean and it doesnt jump.
Anyone had similar problems, or can give me a tip as to what I´m doing wrong?

2. On my Jupiter I use a S80 C*, which sounds just great and is easy to blow. Now, using the same setup on the Yamaha it gives a lot more resistance. I tried the mouthpiece that I got with the Jupiter and it was a lot easier to blow on the Yamaha, but the sound is just not so good as the C*.
Anyone got any tips for a nice alround Mouthpiece that would give less resistance?

Maybe these are just a matter of getting used to the yas-62?
 

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Make sure that the ring finger of the left hand comes down at EXACTLY the same time as the other fingers.

Practice slurring from c-d, d-c slowly, and think about the left hand ring finger coming down maybe a little before the other fingers.
 

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As Hakunani says.

I want to add :

I had the experience that focusing on an open throat and a relaxed embouchure does make a huge difference. Read a bit trough the forum, there is plenty of information repeated a thousand times concerning these things.

Every gear you have to get used to again. I went from a very free blowing sax to a sax with a lot more resistance. If I go back, I still like the free blowing, but it feels awkward in the beginning.

Regarding the mouthpiece : you might try a harder reed first, that could make a difference too. If you only play for six months, it's maybe not the time to go and check mouthpieces already. Just my 2 cents, people might disagree.
 

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Easy Does It?
I did read the entire post. Why assume that if a tech checked it out, it's ok?
 

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I agree with what Hakukani said. In addition make sure the back of your tongue is down in the "AHH" position and your throat is open and relaxed like the feel you get at the first part of a yawn (before the swallow reflex takes over). Some saxes play the overtones produced by some notes more easily than others. The second overtone of low D is the high A.

I suggest practicing turning the high A overtone on and off fingering D with the octave key and slurring while moving the back of the tongue up an down as if saying "AHH - EEE - AHH - EEE". This exercise will allow you to control the overtone and not have it control you. :)

John
 

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It's a good exercise indeed. Makes me think about the benefit I already had from what Phil wrote here :
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?t=65006

It learned me how tone is controlled by the opening of your throath. The reaons behind thinking aaah or eeh is the throat opening, not so much the tongue position.

Not to correct you, jbtsax, just to clear it out. I made the mistake myself focusing on tongue position and forgetting about the troath, and that didn't help me much. ;)
 

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I agree with Mope that if the Jupiter was fine with the same m/p then to encounter significant and persistent difficulties with the Yamaha seems odd if it's properly adjusted. Get teacher/better player to play it and see if there's a problem. If the sax is fine then other advice here will help. [edit: The thing you mention about tonguing easing the break crossing actually does make it sound that it's most likely you and not the sax. Still, I say get someone to check it so you've isolated the problem for sure]
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks for the tips. I'm going to get someone else to try it, to see if it really is just me.
It's quite frustrating getting this problem on a "pro" sax, when I didnt have it on my student model.
 

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Crowfield said:
thanks for the tips. I'm going to get someone else to try it, to see if it really is just me.
It's quite frustrating getting this problem on a "pro" sax, when I didnt have it on my student model.
When I was trying out a number of tenor's I found that this problem appeared on some more readily than others and I put it down to the 'action'. I found that new horns had a slightly stiffer action and this made my problem of bringing all the fingers down exactly together to get D2 more obvious than on a sax with a more worn in action. Therefore the new 'pro' saxes appeared to be worse than my worn in Chinese one... Just my opinion.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I got my teacher to try the sax. He had problems as well.
It turned out it was the octave key on top of the crook that had a slight leak. He just bent the lever a very tiny bit and
everything now works fine.
It's amazing what difference a little thing like that can have on a sax!
Now it just sounds wonderful, the action is fantastic and I dont have the problem with the heavy resistance either.
Now I'm a happy Saxer :)
 
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