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Discussion Starter #1
Not really sax related, but I was looking around to practice to play in some major (or minor) keys, without disturbing the neighbors, and something cheap; so I thought it might be a good idea to buy a plastic recorder or so.
I've seen a 5 piece plastic recorder pack for $5 ($1 per recorder), and by the looks of it the plastic seems really cheap, plus, they're in these transparent fluo pink and green colors.

So I went online, at amazon, and see some sell from as cheap as $3, to a good $30.

What's the difference? Plastic is just plastic, right?
I can understand wooden recorders to be a tad more expensive.

What should I go for?
I like good quality, has to be pretty silent, so I probably would prefer a wooden one.

suggestions?
 

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I've played the recorder for something over 50 years now and picked up sax about 22 years ago. I have a wide range of recorders from sopranino to bass (still haven't made the plunge for a Great Bass__$$$!). In my opinion, if you just want something to noodle around on then I wouldn't spend much money. All plastic recorders are NOT created equal (just as all brass saxes are not equal) but unless you're really concerned with tone and intonation then most of them will probably meet your needs. They're dirt cheap for the typical soprano models. I always keep a few cheap ones to give away to kids in the neighborhood and for my grandchildren to mess with when they come to visit. You might be surprised though. The recorder is kind of a fun instrument and even some of the cheaper plastic ones make a decent sound. You might come to like it! And you can take them ANYWHERE without worry. I have some better plastic ones I take to the beach and on vacation. They're still pretty good and really tough to damage and not a big loss if anything does happen to one of them. Good luck and have fun!
Peace.
 

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I would suggest you choose a recorder with "German" fingering. There are two "types" of soprano recorders as far as fingering goes. Many of the recorders you find in stores will be of English or "Baroque" fingering. Sometimes this is indicated by a letter "B" on the back. Anyhow, the German fingering recorders use a fingering for "f natural" that is like a sax, where as, the size of the holes on the Baroque are different and require a "fork" fingering. I buy "German" fingering system recorders each year for my grade four students and purchase a model called "Suzuki SRG-200" from Empire Music in Vancouver. I like the way these play and sound. They come with a bag and a fingering chart and cost less than four dollars each. I keep one in my glovebox!
http://www.empire-music.com/catalogue/english/main/index.html
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not exactly on topic but every time someone mentions recorders I think of this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmj-g4OQYG0
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What the??0.o 0.o:yikes!::yikes!::yikes!:

I would suggest you choose a recorder with "German" fingering. There are two "types" of soprano recorders as far as fingering goes. Many of the recorders you find in stores will be of English or "Baroque" fingering. Sometimes this is indicated by a letter "B" on the back. Anyhow, the German fingering recorders use a fingering for "f natural" that is like a sax, where as, the size of the holes on the Baroque are different and require a "fork" fingering. I buy "German" fingering system recorders each year for my grade four students and purchase a model called "Suzuki SRG-200" from Empire Music in Vancouver. I like the way these play and sound. They come with a bag and a fingering chart and cost less than four dollars each. I keep one in my glovebox!
http://www.empire-music.com/catalogue/english/main/index.html
Thanks for the suggestion, and the remark of buying the german finger type.

I guess now is the time to decide if I'm going with the soprano, or slightly more expensive alto...
I think alto will be slightly closer to a real sax.
Not really willing to cough up $100 for a tenor or bass flute!

What do you guys think of this $15 (shipping included) alto?:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Tudor-Consort-Recorders?sku=464266
 

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Prodigit, I think you'll do fine with one of those. For myself, I don't think the fingering system makes all that much difference (I'm a baroque style player myself), but then I've been playing back and forth from recorder to sax for a long time now. I find one definitely plays into the other but only in positive ways. I'm clearly a better recorder player for having taken up the sax and vice versa.

And thanks, Frank, for the kind word. The plastic recorders are SO cheap these days it doesn't cost enough to notice and I think it's important to encourage young ones to have an interest in music (or for that matter an interest in ANYTHING besides TV and video games).
Peace.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Alright,
I ended up with a german soprano in the end, costing me only $5, (fake)leather pouch, cleaning stickie, booklet, and shipping included!
I don't know how companies can still make profit out of these things at those prices!

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/LMI-German-Soprano-Recorder-with-Book?sku=460050

I am aware it's probably not the world's best flute, but hope it's good enough to learn scales on without the heavy weight and noise levels of a real sax!

I also think it's very kind to give flutes like this to children!
It's one of the easiest instruments (for playing in a C), and hopefully something sticks in those kid's brains when they grow older.
I remember a wooden recorder of my aunt was my first instrument. Then guitar, then piano, then bass, and finally a sax; and now finally a recorder again! :)

It may be silly but I look forward to practicing finger crunching scales :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Darn!
I just read that german fingerings are the worst you can have on a recorder...
I just bought mine, but it seems that when playing any semi tones (like not in C or F) that the tones really suck....
 

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Darn!
I just read that german fingerings are the worst you can have on a recorder...
I just bought mine, but it seems that when playing any semi tones (like not in C or F) that the tones really suck....
You've never really played recorder and now, with one in your hands, you think something sucks on it? Would that have been your reaction to the first week of playing on a new sax for the first time, or would you have said, "wow ~I~ need to spend some time on this new (to me) instrument"? :bluewink:

I would not have bought that particular brand - I'm surprised no one (unless I just plain missed it above) recommended the Yamaha or Aulos recorders. Regarding the German vs Baroque, I play both. For your purposes it probably doesn't matter, but your regarding comment regarding "German fingerings [being] the worst you can have on a recorder" - give the Germans a little credit. I would suppose that, in several hundred years, if the fingering sucked they would've change it, what?

Just relax and have fun exploring your recorder. They're great instruments. Give it some time and I'm sure you're going to enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well I just went by a site's review.
They said the german fingering where only good for playing in c or f, and any sharps or flats would sound out of pitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ah well, the bag provided with it, and the classical book is good.
I found out on the german recorder which is out of tune anyways it is pretty simple to get a tone near to a flat.
Instead of let's say lifting your right index finger, and using the middle finger to create a Gb (or F#) tone, on the german fingering flute I have, I can just use middle, ring and pinky.
It's near to a flat, much nearer than what the booklet or fingering chart tells me.

So instead of one finger, I now use 3 in closed position below the opened note.
 
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