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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see people paying around $150 for a 615 tenor that plays. What's a good price for one that's pretty clean, but needs a repad/ overhaul? I am going to look at one tomorrow asking $165, but that seems a little high.
 

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In my part of the world they simply don’t sell, but if they do they may get €200, €250.

Ask yourself if you would want to invest in a horn that after the overhaul is still going to be worth LESS that the price of the overhaul. Good Horns though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It doesn't play now, will need overhaul. I think the point that the finished cost may be more than the horn is worth is valid, and that's why I solicited opinions, as I thought that might be the case. Thanks for the responses.
 

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Frankly this situation is not unique to this horn and, it has been my point for many years now, will get worse for many low end horns.

If the price of overhauls keeps on rising and the price of the low end horns keeps on dropping, then the only possible outcome is that they will not be overhauled.
 

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It doesn't play now, will need overhaul. I think the point that the finished cost may be more than the horn is worth is valid, and that's why I solicited opinions, as I thought that might be the case. Thanks for the responses.
The value is in the enjoyment of use at a affordable cost. $165+ $500 in repairs. $665 - $10 use/ consumption fee a month for two years($240). Could you sell a good working 615 tenor for $425 ? Buy to repair & flip is bad plan. Buy to use and you end up not liking it. Use the math above to calculate a planed loss at minimum.
How many people dump a old car because the “repair “ is not worth it. Only to go into debt for years on a new one... maybe worth half at the last payment. If you like this horn buy it. $165 is reasonable if cosmetic condition is good. Even better if that includes a mouthpiece, strap or case,maybe some new reeds. It all adds to the deal.
 

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true but for $600 you can buy a horn that needs nothing and would retain its value.

Any money spent on this will be lost.
 

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Yep, but he may not like those horns.:dontknow:
 

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for all we know OP may not like the 615 either
 

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Ok, list some suggestions on playable $600 tenors? He did ask for help, yes?
Conn 16m tenor USA made Directors (aka shooting star) can be had in in good repair for under $500.
 

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Clean stuff has been going up recently. $165 would be less than market value for a clean rebuild candidate. You won't do any better on a clean one, that's for sure. That would be one of my prime candidates for a rebuild too.
 

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I see people paying around $150 for a 615 tenor that plays. What's a good price for one that's pretty clean, but needs a repad/ overhaul? I am going to look at one tomorrow asking $165, but that seems a little high.
Last year I bought 3 different Cleveland 615 tenors all with good very pads so .. not needing overhauls at the moment .

1.An Eastlake Ohio manufactured 615 late 60's vintage . Paid $159 USD
2. A 615 USA (made I think by UMI) mid-70s VINTAGE . Paid $167 USD
3. A 615 manufactured at the Cleveland Ohio factory in the late 50's . Paid $299 USD

I would say hold out for one that has good pads for best value .
 
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