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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Hi All :
I am returning from many years since playing and now , with more free time I have bought a Soprano, an Alto and a Tenor. The embouchure in the soprano is harder than Tenor. My question is ...practicing the Soprano embouchure helps in developing a better Tenor sound ?
Best Wishes
 

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For me, no.

My tone on tenor has improved a lot since I stopped trying to play alto and decided to concentrate on one horn and one set up. I'm sure it's different for everyone, though.
 

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When I was playing both Tenor and Alto, I could not say either one helped the other.

Since I am now playing both Tenor and Baritone, I must say that the Bari playing has help my Tenor playing. But when I am playing Tenor all week and switch back to Bari, it is difficult on Bari for me.

FWIW, Ron M
 

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In a 'round about' way it can help.
Time spent with an instrument that requires a lot of control can only be of benifit.
If you want another challenge take up clarinet. It will make to soprano sax seem easy. :)
 

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I would say Alto... Higher = Tighter, Lower = Looser.
 

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For me, it was a question of voicing. By playing a bit more alto, I heard the equivalent tenor pitches easier and was able to control the higher register better on tenor. Of course, it's all a matter of perspective.
 

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Generally, I think that practicing different horns helps to open your technique to different approaches. Playing horns in different ranges and keys helps to open your ears.
Now, from the experience I made, lower horns help to improve higher horns much more than the other way around:
1. low horns help you to loosen the embouchure
2. low horns asking more air help you build the air support
 

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I think there are various aspects to this. Playing different instruments, different saxes or even singing, helps in the sense that it develops your hearing and intonation sense. As mentioned, playing a larger saxophone helps improving air stream and relaxing your embouchure, both of which will make the sound better. I noticed that alto playing helped my soprano playing, tenor playing helped my alto sound and bariton playing helped my tenor sound. The opposite may possibly not to be true, playing a lot of soprano seems to tighten up the embouchure a bit, which could negatively affect the embouchure on the larger saxophones, however, if you are aware of this you can easily adjust.
 

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If you want another challenge take up clarinet. It will make to soprano sax seem easy. :)
Hm. I have played the clarinet once (for about two hours) and it was not in any way comparable to a soprano sax. As to difficulty - the conductor in my previous band is a very accomplished clarinetist. Once while filling time between two number at a rehearsal, she remarked: "I tried a soprano sax last week - I was unable to get any acceptable sound out of my clarinet for three days!":bluewink:

Back to the OP topic: When I was struggling with my previous tenor (Selmer SA80 II), my baritone playing improved a lot. I don't know why, but I suspect that the amount of concentration needed to get an acceptable piano sound out of the tenor improved my concentration on the baritone. Alto playing did not help at all and soprano is too different from the others to have any influence.
 

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Generally, I think that practicing different horns helps to open your technique to different approaches. Playing horns in different ranges and keys helps to open your ears.
Now, from the experience I made, lower horns help to improve higher horns much more than the other way around:
1. low horns help you to loosen the embouchure
2. low horns asking more air help you build the air support
I agree quite strongly with this. Starting alto, then adding soprano, it took a lot of effort for me to loosen my embouchure and consistently hit the low end on the tenor. However, after having played it for awhile, I find my air support on the alto and soprano much better and easier. They sing for me now. (Trouble is, I've fallen in love with the tenor, and the others sound too high to me now!)
 
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