Sax on the Web Forum banner
41 - 60 of 60 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
Well you've been lucky and also you have not a good sense.... what for you are "good ours" for practice may be a "good our for rest" for people who will catch a plain, who have other time schedule from other country or other region....it's a hotel!
I read this and some of the comments that came after it and thought "Gee, I must be an inconsiderate so-and-so".
But on reflection I think:

For Pete's sake, it's a hotel, not a Trappist monastery! If you're no louder than the TV and are making a noise for a time period considerably shorter than the average movie, at a time when most people are in fact up and about and not trying to sleep ...then that really is not antisocial behaviour. Or are you guys going to tell me you never ever turn the TV on when you're in a hotel room, and always whisper, use sign language or write notes to communicate?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I hate practicing in a hotel room, but I have found that I can make productive use of the time by doing some intensive listening to music and even some transcribing. However, nowadays, to be honest, I just cherish the chance to sleep since I've now got a couple of little boys at home.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,202 Posts
I read this and some of the comments that came after it and thought "Gee, I must be an inconsiderate so-and-so".
But on reflection I think:

For Pete's sake, it's a hotel, not a Trappist monastery! If you're no louder than the TV and are making a noise for a time period considerably shorter than the average movie, at a time when most people are in fact up and about and not trying to sleep ...then that really is not antisocial behaviour. Or are you guys going to tell me you never ever turn the TV on when you're in a hotel room, and always whisper, use sign language or write notes to communicate?
This is a perfect example of the argument hotel owners and police officers run across all the time when dealing with loud and obnoxious patrons. Not only in hotels but in every aspect of "loud life". Some people just don't get it and there is nothing you can say or do to get the point across (that's why noise disturbance calls are high on the list of calls police get). All you can do is walk away shaking your head wondering how people can come up with every possible excuse for being rude. It's pretty interesting human behavior.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,067 Posts
My experience, though I am not quick at learning a new instrument was that flute uses an enormous amount of breathe that I got light-headed after 2 or 3 minutes. I couldn't practice enough because of this and gave up on the flute. Good luck though.
Nah, it takes less air than sax, you were just not forming the aperture correctly and blowing more air than needed.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
This is a perfect example of the argument hotel owners and police officers run across all the time when dealing with loud and obnoxious patrons. Not only in hotels but in every aspect of "loud life". Some people just don't get it and there is nothing you can say or do to get the point across (that's why noise disturbance calls are high on the list of calls police get). All you can do is walk away shaking your head wondering how people can come up with every possible excuse for being rude. It's pretty interesting human behavior.
Hmm. I may be reading more into your post than you meant, but if I've got your drift correctly then I think there's a logical fallacy lurking here. Even accepting that some people who are loud and obnoxious use this argument, it does not follow that everyone who uses this argument is loud and obnoxious. There is a level of noise that is reasonable and acceptable to make. Sustained loud noises and relatively soft noises over a limited period are different - there are degrees in everything. Look, it's not as if I said "it's my hotel room and I'll do what I like in there, up to and including playing scales at fff from 2am to 5am". I actually do think about whether what I'm doing is likely to affect others and act accordingly. I think the reason nobody has complained so far is that nobody has actually heard me, or that if they have it hasn't bothered them.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,007 Posts
I read this and some of the comments that came after it and thought "Gee, I must be an inconsiderate so-and-so".
But on reflection I think:

For Pete's sake, it's a hotel, not a Trappist monastery! If you're no louder than the TV and are making a noise for a time period considerably shorter than the average movie, at a time when most people are in fact up and about and not trying to sleep ...then that really is not antisocial behaviour. Or are you guys going to tell me you never ever turn the TV on when you're in a hotel room, and always whisper, use sign language or write notes to communicate?
I've been lucky i guess...i've never heard any tv or noise in 'my' hotels... thank God for that...
 

· Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008-2017
Series II with Sterling Silver Series III neck. A55 or A45 Jumbo Java. Java Green or Red, 3 or 2.5.
Joined
·
2,312 Posts
For me, practicing in a hotel room has not been an option. The only ocassion I tried, I got the call from the front desk.

I always travel with my saxophone. I always try to find a spot to play. I usually play outdoors, far away from rooms. Try to find somewhere in the beach, for example. At Europe has been kind of easy to play around, nobody cared too much. The only place where I found some restrictions to practice has been Vegas, and I ended playing with a band at a club. In my opinion, somewhere close to the water, like the sea or a lake, is a good spot and I do it at night. If not around that, as stated, a park or the hotel gardens. I try to play tunes and to accommodate what I might practice, as nicely as possible, into them. For example, playing Summertime, wich I play in A (for Alto) I try to play during it, as mellow as possible, A melodic minor, or harmonic sometimes, as fast passages, F# blues or pentatonic, etc..

In Mexico there is absolute no problem to find a conference room available.

I share the thoughts of trying not to practice at the room, for the next door guests.

All the best,

JI
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
6,788 Posts
I don't think any hotel in the U.S. would give you access to the roof. I don't get that either. I seriously doubt they would let you use a conference room. Maybe if you paid for it's use.
I have used ( for free) many conference rooms. They are really no problem at all if they are empty, and hotel staff (for the most part) seems very willing to accommodate. I have also been allowed access to the roof though more rarely. ( only twice) The trick is who and how you ask. for the roof it's the security guy. You'll have to chat him up a bit first. In every case - being super nice and personable is the key. If you spend even ten minutes getting to know someone and do it with sincerity, when you ask a favor - it's a new friend asking - not a stranger with an unreasonable request. They may not have a conference room available, but the relationship ( even though it's a new one) will cause them to try and come up with an alternative.

As for the need - it exists even at many levels. Even good players. If someone calls you to an out of town day gig (such as a day festival) that requires a hotel stay the night before, it does not mean you necessarily know the material. It just means they think you can pull it off. In my case, that means studying sometimes. I have more confidence than I did even a year ago - but I take the responsibility seriously when I get an out of town call. I figure they're spending good money on me and I want to deliver my best. It's not something that happens often, but I'd like more of these gigs and referrals, or video are the best way I know to get them. In both cases, playing well is important. If you just got the material within a day or two, a little specific practice might not be such a bad idea.
 

· Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2008-2017
Series II with Sterling Silver Series III neck. A55 or A45 Jumbo Java. Java Green or Red, 3 or 2.5.
Joined
·
2,312 Posts
Yes, practicing something that I am going to play is essential for me, espcially if I am hired. Many of the things I play I include altissimo and have to figure very well how to insert it, making it musically.

As for the need - it exists even at many levels. Even good players. If someone calls you to an out of town day gig (such as a day festival) that requires a hotel stay the night before, it does not mean you necessarily know the material. It just means they think you can pull it off. In my case, that means studying sometimes. I have more confidence than I did even a year ago - but I take the responsibility seriously when I get an out of town call. I figure they're spending good money on me and I want to deliver my best. It's not something that happens often, but I'd like more of these gigs and referrals, or video are the best way I know to get them. In both cases, playing well is important. If you just got the material within a day or two, a little specific practice might not be such a bad idea.
 

· Forum Contributor 2015-17
Joined
·
830 Posts
Nah, it takes less air than sax, you were just not forming the aperture correctly and blowing more air than needed.
I play the flute, and for me it takes more air than the sax (alto and tenor). Possibly, if you're playing with a really open m/p you would use as much air on the sax, but not more.
 

· Premium Member
Tenor Selmer reference 54
Joined
·
83 Posts
I have to do some travel for work (day job). I'm hoping to bring my axe and practice in the hotel when I have time.

Has anyone done this successfully? Will the hotel/neighbors make me stop?

My sax is pretty loud, tenor with big metel mpc. Maybe a towel in the bell would make it ok.

Any advice? Is it worth taking it along or should I bring a book instead?

Thanks
Read all the responses of the thread and tried their suggestions (conference rooms, roof requests, etc) with no much luck. I keep travelling for work and bring my alto/soprano with me but it has been tough. I’ll be trying the Travel Sax 2: small, quiet, low profile. I know it’s not the same, but can spend some time working on difficult passages and keeping my beloved horns safe at home.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
38,342 Posts
I am on travel now, and practice across the street from my room in a 6-story parking structure.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
does alto flute have practical applications? If I got one, could I use it in big band for example? Does it read C music?

Thanks for the advice
does alto flute have practical applications? If I got one, could I use it in big band for example? Does it read C music?

Thanks for the advice
There are some big band arrangements that call for saxophonists to double on alto flute. Example: "A Child Is Born" by Thaad Jones.
 
41 - 60 of 60 Posts
Top