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I THINK My biggest problem on flute is that I accept too many small mistakes . Not paying enough attention to eveness and articulation. K
 

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To be honest with myself this is probably the main reason I've never advanced beyond advanced beginner. Instead of stopping at the first missed note and playing it slowly to get it perfect I play through it. After years of frustration I found a teacher who taught me how to play slowly to get it perfect before moving on. Old habits die hard though. Every time you play it wrong you reinforce the mistake. She actually gave me a number based on research but I don't remember what it was. Something like 15 times playing it correctly to counteract playing it wrong once. If there's anything to that then it's worth your time to play as slowly as you have to to make it perfect.
 

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Articulations in classical music are one of the main ways to delineate the emotion or affect. Once you can determine the affect of each section (assuming its not just stated in words), the given articulations should make more sense. There should be a reason why the articulations are the way they are assuming you aren't playing an exercise with random articulation changes that are meant to catch you out (like some of the articulation studies in the Rubank Advanced).

You would play more accurately in the more technical sections if you would lock into the rhythms (especially the sextuplets). Just hearing the rhythms internally or saying them without playing once or twice will let the rhythms drive the speed of your fingers. In the recorded example you're playing and the metronome is playing but they aren't in synch much of the time. That isn't a flute thing, but a mental thing that probably is a problem in all of your playing. Again, if you lock the rhythms to the metronome into your head before playing, the notes will be easier to play as you will not have to concentrate on the rhythms anymore and it will allow you to concentrate on the notes.

I hope this helps. You are braver than me to post recordings of things that aren't finished yet.
 

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Adagietto at first.... but if lips mean everything .... a daily study that often breaks into song..... when the tone is right.
2A5979E3-5C0D-4F32-9C1A-1A321D764821.jpeg
Disregard Miles when he said that the silence between the notes is important...... super crisp and unnoticeable between tones. :soapbox: :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All great ideas, Thanks, thats why I pay someone 60 an hour. To stop me and make me play it right or sometimes to notice when I need to stop and do it correctly . I've taken many of my tendencies for granted and not "heard" all the blips and subtle things. Thanks again, and since I gig alot now(so I don't need more playing opportunities ) and am not worried about making money I post many things on SOTW that I'm working on with mistakes and all. If I do anything here on SOTW I would want people to practice more, and more efficiently. Thats better use of focus for me rather then the next/horn/mouthpiece/reed/study/lig/shoe color, etc. K So I have practice with Kride. Actually practice something K
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Adagietto at first.... but if lips mean everything .... a daily study that often breaks into song..... when the tone is right.
View attachment 237144
Disregard Miles when he said that the silence between the notes is important...... super crisp and unnoticeable between tones. :soapbox: :cheers:

I have this exercise somewhere. Is it from the Moyse book? K
 

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Just an observation - with a video like this I might suggest after doing the introduction that you shift the camera focus over so the viewer is hearing you but looking at the music. When you stop and go back it will then make sense to the viewer (assuming they are following along) as to why and, if you point at the spot in the exercise for clarity, where as well. I have this etude book but I haven't started working on them yet as I'm still fighting my way through Melodious and Progressive Studies so I'm not familiar with this specific exercise. I admit I was too lazy to go down to my studio and dig this book up so I could follow along but I'd have to bet that many of your viewers likely don't even have that option.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks I did this quick and dirty. I no longer have the patience to add the subtitles and do edits like I used to . But good ideas K
 
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