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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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It is interesting to know whether participants in the forum practice creating a preliminary emotional script for improvisation, even spontaneous ; so to say, the plan for emotional improvisation ?

https://www.medicaldaily.com/emotio...on-happiness-activates-different-brain-367718

For me it's mainly about whatever the context of the song or the tune. If it's a song the lyrics are hugely important in setting the tone, but also the performance of the other musicians especially if there is a lead singer.

I might especially be cosnscious if it's a blues, e.g. is it sad, sexy, loving, aggressive etc.

I would try not to use the performance as an agenda for my own personal emotional communication unless it was appropriate, e.g. with my own compositions. But if I approach the performance thinking I need to express what I'm feeling leading up to it, I'm not sure that's a good thing. For example my girlfriend left me that day, then the cat threw up oin my saxophone case, I was stuck in traffic and I've lost my wallet. To some extent that will affect my performance, but do I really want to unload all that on an audience? No - the music itself and the messages in the music should be the main factor.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I don't catch the connection with the question.
I can see the connection, or at least food for further thought, though it may not be so relevant to the article/research - although admittedly I only skimmed it a bit as a tend to have a problem with that sort of thing.
 

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Yes, if it is in the framework of a theatrical performance or a film.
Music is much more than that, who you are is what comes out.

You dont think the emotions , you feel them !
Your selection of the repertoire for the gig should be enough, and that should be according to what you feel playing, If possible.
Trying to rationalise everything in order to control it better takes the magic away and sounds unnatural.
Imagine you have to take a girl out for the first night and you have the need to create a preliminary emotional script so you can control the way things will go.
She will run away screaming
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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I just try to get in touch with my emotions before starting a tune. The idea is to play a tune based on these emotions. Ideally, the same blues will (hopefully) sound different depending on how I feel at the moment I play it - sad when I'm happy, sadder when I 'm blue.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I just try to get in touch with my emotions before starting a tune. The idea is to play a tune based on these emotions.
Yes, that's good for a start. However, music is not static and requires development; the same applies to emotions. Even in the funeral march of Chopin, the bridge is in major. So I'm talking about the script.
 

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Some people improvise all their lives in all aspects of their lives. Others organize their lives on the basis of a plan.

Improvisation in music can be prepared and unprepared, I think it is not bad idea to prepare (even in own's mind) such an emotional outline for the performance. Of course, the emotional effect will be achieved when we manage to achieve it (even performing live improvisation).
It is not said that an emotional plan must help, but also spontaneous improvisation on the emotional platform does not have to be successful.

The important is: Will the script be implemented during performance?
If yes, it doesn't matter whether it was planned (hours before) or carried out spontaneously (seconds before playing).
And important is to express your emotions at the right time (moment of performance).
 

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"Overall, each emotional improvisation induced changes in the angular gyrus, precuneus, and perisylvian language areas (along with the changes noted in the DLPFC and SMA)."
I heard that Miles discussed this principle in detail with all his groups in the studio, prior to all his recording sessions.
 

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No. The only emotions I'm concerned with are the ones my playing instills in the listeners. Other than that, I get personal excitement and gratification out of playing. If the subject is about using an instrument in a way as to convey a certain emotion, as is done in everything from opera to cartoons, no, I think that's pretty corny if we're talking about jazz improvisation here. Think trombone going 'wah, wah, wah' to illustrate sadness - you want to stand in front of a crowd and do that?
 

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- the music itself and the messages in the music should be the main factor.
+1. This comes pretty close to what I'd say on the topic. Can't really analyze it much beyond that.

However, I will say that one time when one of my band mates really pissed me off about something (I don't remember what it was exactly), my anger drove me to play with a lot of aggression and it seemed to me I played one of my best solos of the evening, driven along by my anger. Probably not the best way to get to a good performance, but it seemed to work in that one case. Or I might have been imagining that I was playing better....On a more positive note, I do feel like I play better, or more inspired, when the audience is up and dancing and seeming to be enjoying the music.
 

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The music itself, specifically the melody and sometimes the lyrics, is enough to evoke an emotional response in me. I don't need to do anything to get myself into character the way an actor would. It's more like there's a river of emotion inside and when I play I can choose to open up the gate a little or a lot and let some of it out.

Ever since Aristotle, philosophers and critics have written about the "catharsis" that art can unleash and when I listen to great players, I definitely feel it. Humans seem to have an innate need for this.

That was an interesting article, BTW.
 

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The music itself, specifically the melody and sometimes the lyrics, is enough to evoke an emotional response in me.
I agree, this is the crux of the matter.

In fact, deciding to play a song, we have a plan in mind, because it is imposed in some way by the nature of the composition, its harmony (and planned and implemented arrangement).
The emotional plan depends to a large extent on the emotional points of tension / unloading tension in the phrases, and this has already been to some extent planned (composed) by the music author, composer.
Of course changing is the heart of music (especially of improvising), but harmony points of tension / unload tension impose a lot on us while playing and improvising.

Like JL mentioned above, we can do it less or more successfully, more or less agressive, it depends on OUR current emotional state, stimulation, involvement in the playing moment.
 

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Hopefully as I progress in my ability to express anything it shows in the performance. You can be extremely in touch with whatever feeling you have and you will still only get out of the horn what your ability level determines. K
 
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