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Discussion Starter #1
I have a old Dukoff Silverite Miami tenor piece that has developed a small stress crack across the baffle about 1cm in from the tip from tooth pressure. Is it possible to stabilize this, or is it destined for the garbage? Solder? Silver solder? Thoughts and prayers? View attachment 230898

It's a nice sounding and pretty scarce piece...
Thanks for any advice!
 

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Silverite is soft stuff so it will likely melt before solver solder. Soft solder wouldn't help.

I've heard of someone allegedly being able to fill tooth wear in the metal with a fine welder, but I'm not sure if it would work for this.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Seems like epoxy would fill the void, but not necessarily keep the crack from expanding...or would it? It's cracking from tooth pressure, which is going to continue to exert force on the weakened area. Will epoxy help that?
 

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'Silverite' is lead-free pewter with maybe a small amount of silver. It has a low melting point and don't forget the plastic bite plate is on the other side. in fact I think the mouthpiece has been worked-on and the crack is actually the forward edge of the cut for the bite plate. I think maybe the baffle area was sanded at some point and they went too far. Silverite actually doesn't crack - it bends too easily and would normally only crack from metal fatigue after repeated bending. Whatever caused the opening, a possible fix would be to remove the bite plate insert, tap the bulge back into place and smooth it, then fill the bite plate area with epoxy and smooth it down. You would figure on using a thin patch with it from then on.
 

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That's a weird little crack. Seems way too close to the tip to be from your teeth. I would guess it's related to unrelieved stress from the original casting. Or, as 1saxman notes above, it could be the recess for the bite plate printing through.

From all accounts, repairing an old Dukoff with any kind of solder is probably a non-starter.

I would consider cleaning the whole thing up real well with acetone, then when certain it's completely evaporated, dripping some wicking grade cyanoacrylate into the crack to try to stabilize it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It is, in fact, more or less in line with the edge of the bite plate, but in front of the tooth-wear groove. So it is the front edge of the plastic bite plate pressing down in the recess where the metal is the thinnest. It's definitely a crack; there's no "bulging" of the baffle, so nothing to "tap back into place".

The piece has definitely been worked on; mostly to enlarge the chamber, and it does appear the baffle was taken down and rolled bit as well. I don't imagine this is the first old Dukoff to have the baffle worked on -and it really doesn't look like much metal was removed from this spot- but this front part of the baffle underneath the bite plate recess is the thinnest point. I've never seen this before, but that doesn't mean it hasn't happened.

Wicking in some cyanoacrylate does sound like a reasonable idea. Not sure if it will stop the progress, but I don't think it could hurt anything.
 

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XXXXXX figured out how to mig weld Silverite. But mostly to fill in missing material. I don’t think welding would help much here.

I had to edit out the name Mojo. He was such a con artist and ripped off so many members here, I don't want him to get any victims via SOTW.

Saxismyaxe.
 

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Not that its any help but I vote silverite as one of the worst materials ever chosen to make a mpc.

The only thing worse would be a stick of butter on a hot day.

I think you best bet is a thick bite plate and a prayer.

Silverite pieces degrade overtime in numerous ways...care for it and play it until its dead.

During that time find a piece made out of something better than play-doh

Its a shame so much of BD's legacy will vanish due to the choice of materials.
 

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Start looking for one of the earlier Super Power Chambers made of brass. I had one and it could make the audiences eyes bleed. The absolutely brightest and loudest mouthpiece I’ve had. The sound was just too brittle for me but it would scare guitar players.
 

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Yea I have a few older nickel plated over brass ones and some silverite ones and they don’t make people’s eyes bleed if you know how to play one. In fact they are great pieces and I have concluded that for me silverite has its own sound. They sound different then brass ones. Of all the material I’ve tried silverite is the sound I go for. I’ve made a good part of my living with that”pot” metal and I’ve tried everything.
 

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Didn’t Boots Randolph play one of these pieces.
A D9 I think it was.
He didn’t sound brittle on it.
Pepper Adams did also I believe, he on the other hand did sound a little brittle to me on some recordings.
I got one as case candy with a tenor a few years back.
It wasn’t my thing, the most chirpy piece ive ever come across.
Having said that it sold really quickly to someone who absolutely loved it.
I can’t imagine working on one of these with a file, wouldn’t it just clog up straight away?.
 

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I would send pics to Keith Bradbury AKA Mojobari
before doing anything drastic.
He has saved my Miami D7 twice now,which is a versatile piece,btw...
not necessarily a wallpaper peeler...
 

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Boots Randolph did all his most memorable work on first a Link, then he changed to a little-known Brilhart metal called 'Velvet Brass' on which he recorded all his hits, starting with Yakety Sax. He stayed on that until the bite plate popped out and the table was ruined from leaving reeds on it sometime in the late '90s. At that same time, he also retired his MK VI tenor and began to use a Selmer USA although his 'official' horn, as a Selmer artist, was a SA80II. He used a Dukoff on that horn until he passed at age 80. I thought it was a D9 too but that would have been more open for him than the Brilhart which was a 7*. I heard that he ordered the Dukoffs by the dozen and picked one or two out at a time. I love the Dukoff sound too. I once had an M9 that was the most powerful mouthpiece I have ever played.

Again, pop out the bite plate, smooth out the baffle, fill the bite plate recess with epoxy, sand to correct contour and put a thin patch on it. You can make a custom epoxy that will be close to original appearance by adding pewter dust to clear epoxy (for the metal appearance) or Ebonite dust to clear epoxy for the black appearance. You can find cheap/free pewter all over the place and you can use any old junk hard rubber mouthpiece, clarinet or bowling ball for the Ebonite. In either case you take a file and file off enough dust to do the job then mix it with the clear epoxy to make a paste, then pack it into the recess. You'll have to move fast because of the curing of the two-part epoxy. Then file/sand it down after curing.
 

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Being a dentist, I would use a light-cured flowable composite such as Dentsply Caulk SurFil. Dimensionally stable, safe, easy to work with and very durable. In addition to the product, which comes in little cartridges with a metal tip of about 1mm in diameter, a high intensity curing light and a gun to push the unset material out of the cartridge would be needed. Perhaps you can ask your local dentist for some help.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, this was a great learning experience for me. Despite some great and wise suggestions offered here, I decided to try to smooth out and fill the crack by very carefully using the tip of a regular soldering iron.

BIG. MISTAKE.

What I found was that not only is the melting point of Silverite similar regular solder, it also behaves in a similar fashion. I expected by carefully and gently rubbing the tip over the crack, the metal would gradually soften and I could smooth it down. Nope. I learned Silverite doesn't soften and become malleable with heat, but like soft solder, it immediately goes from hard/solid metal to running liquid in the blink of an eye. In a fraction of a second, the mouthpiece was totally destroyed. Not even enough time to utter an expletive; just stare in amazement.

I now have excellent first-hand knowledge of how NOT to repair a cracked Silverite Dukoff.
 

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If you ever get another one that needs repair now you have something to get filings from to mix in with your epoxy. 🙂
 

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Who in their right mind would choose a soft metal like this to make a mouthpiece? Insanity.
 
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