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I know people use plumber's tape for their mouthpieces. Anybody use it for the tenon joints on their horn?
 

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Teflon tape is always a handy thing for a clarinet or sax player to have around. There's no reason it could not be used in a pinch on a clarinet joint. But cork replacement is cheap, so I personally would not recommend making it a long term solution on a joint.

Mouthpieces are a different issue since some neck corks (saxes) and barrels (clarinet) fit different mp's differently. You may have a clarinet mp you want to play on two different clarinets, and it fits the two barrels differently. Teflon tape would probably be a good permanent solution. Same for using different mp's on a sax - one fits your neck cork great and one is too loose - and again the teflon tape gives you the option of using either mp.
 

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But he´s asking to use it on the tenon. I don´t think this is a good permanent solution. A neck should have a perfect fit to the body.
 

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Seriously,

Tried the Teflon tape on clarinet tenons. As a prelude to my "Recorking all the kid's Clarinets" saga, which is just a glorified way of saying "you can teach an old Dog new tricks, but you'll burn yourself in the process," I tried an emergency repair on a shot Clarinet tenon by using the Teflon tape.

Had no other choice. Band competition the following day.

In hindsight, I got very lucky. Lucky the Clarinet didn't get broken and cost me a "fistful of lobsters."

Teflon will work for all of 15 minutes before it shrinks, compacts or whatever Gordon says it does. (and I'll bet he knows. :) )

Then the various parts of your Clarinet will go their separate ways like a Hollywood marriage.

It's just not worth tempting fate.

Thing is, you can avoid the whole drama with a little preventative measure.

Learn to recork tenons yourself and always keep some cork handy. It's easier than falling off a log and takes no time at all.....the 10th time anyway. :D ;)

If I can do it, anyone can do it. Get a kit from musicmedic and do it right. You'll enjoy every minute of it. Except the burning bit.
 

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Actually I have the odd customer who used it in an emergency and then has been happy enough with it that they have not wanted me to re-do it. But I think it has always been used over cork. I don't think a solid chunk of it would be so good.

It can take up some of the wobble for a poorly fitting tenon when it overlaps to the timber part of the tenon.

I don't use it as part of my work, but from my experience of it, I only know of two downsides:

1. It does not accommodate different size sockets well (eg different mouthpieces on sax) without adding or removing Teflon each time.

2. It looks makeshift.
 

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When the need arises, I always use dental floss. It works great and the wax helps it stick.
 

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Since the purpose of "plumber's tape" (which is actually a very thin gauge ribbon of Teflon plastic) is to fit within the spaces in a standard threaded joint, it stands to reason that using it for a cork makeup device would both require a lot of it, and would involve movement of the successive layers against each other as much as it would allow the mouthpiece to do the same thing.

A better "emergency repair" item would be either vinyl tape or medical tape.

I carry a couple of rolls of clear hockey tape (used to tape up socks and the like by hockey players) in our "gig bag" (a duffel bag that goes to all band jobs) for stuff like this. It's easy to cut, stretches slightly, and adheres very well to itself, and works well for everything from taping up a wire connection for the sound system to building up a dying mouthpiece cork.

The other alternative is a lot more costly, but has more "give" to it in compression terms. This tape replaces the old adhesive tape used to build up custom sized bandages. Again, it's easy to manage, and cleans up well in the bargain.

Push comes to shove, there are few problems in the world that cannot be patched up by enough hockey tape. Oddly enough, I don't use it when I play hockey, but have found dozens of uses for it with everything else.

One caveat there, however. It is not electrical tape, despite how much it may look and act like it.
 

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The adhesives from tape tend to migrate in my experience. It seems to make everything near it very sticky. I use teflon plumbers tape to build up compressed cork to improve the seal, but not as a replacement for missing cork. I have two mouthpieces which have different bores that I regularly use on tenor . A few wraps of teflon and the bigger one fits fine. Remove it and the smaller one fits fine. (the smaller one is stainless so I am not about to bore it out)

I tried teflon on a clarinet mouthpiece once and it didn't work as well as it does on a sax. It also left residue in the barrel. Dental floss might be a better temporary option. I'll have to toss some in the case for the next time.
 

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Waxed string, either the traditional German type coated with beeswax or the more modern equivalent (waxed dental floss) will work just fine, as many hundreds of thousands of clarinets, bassoons and oboes will attest. However, its a bit more tricky to maintain.

I'd not advocate using any tape with adhesive as anything but a temporary solution. In such cases, the mess that it might leave will be removed when the permanent solution is implemented. For radically different mouthpiece sizes (a problem that I have never had), I would go the two necks solution. But, to each his own, as Doris Day used to sing with nauseating regularity...
 

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SOTSDO said:
For radically different mouthpiece sizes (a problem that I have never had), I would go the two necks solution. But, to each his own, as Doris Day used to sing with nauseating regularity...
If Hohner president tenors were common I might try that (double tenon) but the tape takes seconds to install or remove and has been working well for 2 years now.
 

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SOTSDO said:
Since the purpose of "plumber's tape" (which is actually a very thin gauge ribbon of Teflon plastic) is to fit within the spaces in a standard threaded joint, it stands to reason that using it for a cork makeup device would both require a lot of it, and would involve movement of the successive layers against each other as much as it would allow the mouthpiece to do the same thing.

A better "emergency repair" item would be either vinyl tape or medical tape..
I disagree, especially for several turns used to build up a tired cork.
The layers of Teflon actually have an inherent stickiness, and under pressure, seem to 'weld' to each other, and do not slide across each other as much as you seem to think.

I, too, dislike adhesive tapes because of the combination of the relative rigidity and tendency to 'creep'.
 

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Some time ago, someone - and I can't remember who, was singing the praises of the London Transport "Bus Ticket" as an emergency shim.
The "Bus Ticket" is made from moderately thick soft unglazed paper - you wrap as much as is needed and save the rest for next time.

Anyone out there know a locally available equivalent????
 

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Isn't it pretty similar to the little squares of note paper? I've seen such paper stay on reasonably well when applied to a damp surface. Cigarette paper too, and it is thinner.

But in my expereience, Teflon tape is better.
 

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Something I've seen done in our jazz band with our old bari (it was dying, cork was falling apart, horn had more holes than a piece of swiss)...

...We took or of those inserts from a box of vandoren reeds to wrap around the cork. The paper stuck well if you got it a little wet, and it didn't bunch when you put the mouthpiece on because it was glossy paper, and it let the mouthpiece slide over it easily.

Thankfully we got a new bari shortly there after and put our old signet out to pasture (marching band).
 

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I currently have teflon tape on 2 of the joints on my Bb. I have not had time to get to my repairman so it has been this way for a couple of months. I have played a number of gigs and it has worked great. If it compresses, I simply add another layer or two. I do plan on getting out to my tech over the holidays. In the meantime, it is a great easy fix.
 

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I find Duct tape awful stuff for tenons, and many other things. A very short-period, emergency band-aid at best.

1. It doesn't last long before the glue goes slimey. Sovents certainly turn it slimey. What a gooey mess!
2. Its surface friction is too high.
2. If a tenon cork needs that thickness extra, then it is way, way overdue for replacement.

Plumber's Teflon tape is vastly superior.

All IMHO.
 
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