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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The instrument while obviously the older make is in basically unused condition.
What model is this? And please, give me the approximate sales range on the used market.
Serial: 06786XXX - what year of production is it?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Looks like an S-6 from the 1970’s early 1980’s. Not sure if the current value but thinkin’ $1,200 to $1,500. Maybe more since the Selmer Mark VI ( from which this is a copy) has skyrocketed in price the last few years.
 

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It is possible from what I read that the first 4 digits are the month and year - June 1978, as the year and month of manufacture. But if the serial number follows the sequence is uncertain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Returning to this thread I started last year.

Question please: Is straight one-piece Yani S6 supposed to be 100% straight by its design?
No slight "banana" bends in the upper part are natural to this model?

Mine had an obvious bend originating at the LH plastic thumb rest going up the "neck" and I already managed to get it about 98% straight.
 

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The slight bend was supposedly to assist with improved intonation for the notes above high A and may have contributed to reputation of the S6 for superior tuning over the Selmer Mark VI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, no! My friends, are you in agreement?
I see there are 2 contradicting opinions here: one is S6 HAS the slight bend to improve the intonation. Another is NO bend from the factory.
Which is correct?

No rod mounted upper stack keys were binding after straightening except for the upper stack pivoted G (on separate posts) that began to bind a little but was unbound with a minute pivot turn. There was no slack in the keys "now". However - there was no slack before the bend was fixed either! It's easy to explain - the bend was in the upper part starting at the LH thumb rest.

I haven't tested it yet. It's disassembled for the final tune up, a few cork/felt replacement and oiling.

Please note: the bend wasn't aligned with the thumb rests and the neck strap ring. It was around 30 degrees off of the "thumb rests - neck strap ring" line. Otherwise I'd have some really deep doubts.

No bends when they left the factory. None.

98%? How does it play? Slop in the keys? Etc?
The slight bend was supposedly to assist with improved intonation for the notes above high A and may have contributed to reputation of the S6 for superior tuning over the Selmer Mark VI.
 

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The slight bend was supposedly to assist with improved intonation for the notes above high A and may have contributed to reputation of the S6 for superior tuning over the Selmer Mark VI.
I don’t know where that came because it seems even Yanagisawa doesn’t answer questions about old models.
The “Superior Intonation” is a definite myth started on the interweb.
As an old Yanagisawa owner, A4 and T4, I do like them, but they ain’t no MarkVI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have another question on the Yani pads of that period, that is around 1978. It looks like the original pads on this horn are almost new (the horn apparently was played dozen of times at best). The pads are supple and clean.

What are Yanagisawa pads of that period? I water tested one and it's not water resistant and it absorbs water immediately, it appears the pads are not treated.
I have Runyon pad dope and many reported it's a good treat for pads. Any experience with these period Yani pads and Runyon pad dope?
 

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Not remembering what the factory pads are ... I have had several Yany saxes from that era apart.
Good quality tan leather, brown nylon resos, the tiniest amount of shellac.

Have not used pad dope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The leather itself looks good but as I noted above it appears to be untreated.
The pads while almost new reveal the aggressive clamping method that was used at the factory to seat them. I'll check the tone hole chimneys to see how they are leveled but since the pads do not need replacement that will be solely for the information at this time.
I've read somewhere else that Japanese manufactures were/are particularly notorious for hard pad clamping to compensate for the unleveled tone holes in the modern sax production period. I'm not concerned about that, just mentioning.
 

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Sure ... Could be.

Whatever they do, it works. Despite the parsimonious use of adhesive, and any other deficiencies real or imagined,
Yanagisawa and Yamaha seem to have the best QC in the business.


My second hand A880 gave 20ish years of excellent service on the factory setup. When I was preparing to sell it,
I disassembled and cleaned with the intention of replacing pads as needed.
The pads looked soaked, but still sealed really well. All were still workable.
I replaced nothing.

Whichever pads they use, they are pretty good.
 
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