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Problem line: eighth notes at swing 168: B2-D2-F#2-A2-G#2.

I cannot get D2 to F#2 to sound cleanly--there is an extra burble as either F or D key lifts before the other going from RH three keys down to only middle key down.

Sometimes subtle, but it muddies up the line.

I believe this is isolated to my fingers (not an instrument issue). The simultaneous-double-bracket-lift is rough to do cleanly.

Any tips, other than practice slow, then speed up? Thanks.
 

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The typical solution of course is to isolate the note change, start slow, and then gradually speed up moving the fingers together. In this case it would be a tremolo between D and F#. An alternate way to finger that passage would be to play F# xxx|oox. That way you are lifting the first two fingers of the right hand rather than the first and third which is more awkward. The use of this fingering for F# requires that your sax be in perfect regulation for the note to speak clearly. Hope this helps.
 

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No way to fix this other than practice. This is why it's important to practice all your major, minor, diminished, and augmented arpeggios with a metronome.
 

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Practice slowly with the Metronome. On the click of the metronome the fingers are moving as fast as possible from one position to the other. Think of a machine. From one position to the other it can not take longer than the click of the metronome otherwise other positions of fingers will react as other notes. For instance from D to F#; if third finger of right hand moves quicker than the first, you will hear E
 

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Having been playing in the 'sharp' keys many years and with the D arpeggio being one of my favorites, I have to say I have never even thought of this problem before. Perhaps the OP mainly needs to get more proficient - the sax is easy to play (initially) but as with everything else takes time and perseverance to excel.
 

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Thing is, finger bobbles can pop up even after years of playing.

A few years ago, I suddenly found myself having serious issues with clean execution when playing passages in:

C major!

I remember it because I distinctly remember thinking "what the hell is wrong with you? All of a sudden you can't play cleanly in C major?"

So, back to the woodshed with the metronome set at "slowissimo" until I ironed those wrinkles back out.
 
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