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I havnt seen any soloists with the D on the table like that?! It's definitely a soloist tho and it not a modern one I don't think.
 

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I havnt seen any soloists with the D on the table like that?! It's definitely a soloist tho and it not a modern one I don't think.
No, not modern for sure. I have owned this piece for ages.
 

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I have a C* like the D in the photo. A measurement would help confirm it. I don’t have it with me right now (on vacation). A while back I was told mine was an Airflow. Without the word SOLOIST on it, the one in the photo may be an Airflow. DAVE
 

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Hi bro,
This is an Airflow model. This is the version they made after the ones that had the word Airflow stamped on the table. They put a letter denomination in the oval on the table.

These are worth very good money so don’t sell this cheap.
 

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Hi,
This is an Airflow model. This is the version they made after they stopped using the word Airflow on the table, and put a letter denomination in the oval on the table.

These are worth very good money so don’t sell this cheap.
Good to know! Thanks
 

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This is the version just before the short shank. Not certain when it started, possibly near the end of the BA, or at the start of the SBA, but for certain they were the mouthpiece that came with certain versions of the SBA.

Similar to the short shank soloists to look at externally, but inside, the throat is round, unlike the U shape soloists.

For me they are a little darker than the soloists, with a little less zing. Lovely singing quality to them.

I have an original E for tenor and a couple for alto.
 

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+1 to what 10mfan and KMR said - this style was made in the late 40's to mid 50's until the Soloists came out, so it would have been the mouthpiece that came with the SBA and maybe with some early MK VIs.

Is it a soprano piece? I have a 60's Soloist-Style soprano E, which has the E on the back, not the table - before that I had a C* of the same type which I believe I sold for ~$350 around 5 years ago or so.
 

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+1 to what 10mfan and KMR said - this style was made in the late 40's to mid 50's until the Soloists came out, so it would have been the mouthpiece that came with the SBA and maybe with some early MK VIs.

Is it a soprano piece? I have a 60's Soloist-Style soprano E, which has the E on the back, not the table - before that I had a C* of the same type which I believe I sold for ~$350 around 5 years ago or so.
Thank you for your input. Yes, it's a soprano piece.
 

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I have a 60's Soloist-Style soprano E, which has the E on the back, not the table -
I’m not certain, but I dont think these “soloist style”. Ie no “soloist” written on the table were as early as the 60s.

I think they were later. Certainly they were the Selmer mouthpiece in the 70s, right up until the change to the S80 mouthpiece was introduced. In surprise, surprise.... 1980. !!

I have a couple of these non soloist versions in my box of goodies. For me they are a different vibe than the short shank and long shank soloists.

certainly on alto and tenor, they are less desirable/valuable than proper soloists.
 

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Think you're right, according to Theo "The Soloist Style mouthpieces were produced primarily in the late 1960s and 1970s. Because they look like the Soloist mouthpieces, but are not marked Soloist, they are called Soloist Style." Here is a good reference: https://theowanne.com/knowledge/mouthpiece-museum/selmer-mouthpieces/

Now that I think of it though mine has a small round chamber, not U-shaped like the soloists. Did soprano mouthpieces keep the round chamber?
 

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I bought my soprano Airflow C* new at a music store in downtown L.A. in 1957. I was 17 years old then and didn’t know squat about most anything saxophone (probably still don’t) except that the Selmer scroll-shank they sold me played better than the piece I was using at the time.

I hope that helps establish a time-line. DAVE
 
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