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First time post: yesterday, the horn was hot to touch, just awful. I tuned it before playing (as usual), but it played out of tune horribly (sometimes I wish I didn't have my ear) - I finally thought through the physics: that my breath was actually cooling the horn instead of warming it. It occurred to me that maybe playing a metal mouthpiece (i use a Jody Jazz DV and love it), made my tuning nightmare worse. Any suggestions out there re: rubber v metal in the heat? Thanks for any feedback!
 

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I don't think the mouthpiece choice will make much difference. All horns (brass included) will go way sharp in extremely hot weather, and flat in cold weather. From what I understand, it has more to do with the velocity of the air column in the horn. To make matters worse, stringed instruments tend to go the opposite way - flat in heat and sharp in cold.

I played an outdoor gig last week in 94 degree heat with very high humidity. It was a struggle all afternoon. I had my mouthpiece literally hanging off the edge of the neck. The trombone and trumpet players had to pull way out too. Of course, that throws the whole pitch center of the horn off, so constant adjustment was in order. I thought about asking the rhythm players to tune up to 445, but it was a multi band festival, and we didn't have time to muck with it.
 

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In that big jam session in Hell, the horn & wind players play sharp... and the string players play flat.

That's why it's Hell.
 

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Mouthpiece material isnt going to make a difference. A metal mouthpiece and a hard rubber piece may change temperature at different rates but if you sit them both in the same warm room they will both end up the same temp. And as mentioned...its more about the air column and speed than material.In terms of cooling the mpc with exhaled air...you exhale aprox 95 degrees. 94 if you have asthma. The mouthpiece ambient temp can be hotter on a hot day but unless you were doing a Death Valley gig I dont think the differential would be significant enough to cause any issues...least of all tuning
 

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YES!!!! I was just about to ask about playing in high heat. My 1953 10M DOES NOT like the heat & high humidity! As others have said, "Mouthpiece almost falling off, The rest of the horn was horridly out of tune"

It was awful!!!! This is the second time this has happened to me, last night was an absolute embarrassment!!! I was doing a duo gig with an extremely talented female vocalist & backing tracks.... I stunk the place up.

My 1968 MkVI alto seemed a little more forgiving and semi-rescued me, but put tunes into different keys... miserable,

I play Fibracells, so reeds shouldn't be contributing to greatly to the problem

Any suggestions-hints- words of wisdom?
 

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I was playing an outdoor gig last summer standing in the sun and heat playing my old rubber Link.
It smelled like I was sucking on a Goodyear. I only play my metal Link in the heat now.
 

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wisdom..? haha

Heat and Cold both can REALLY mess things up..I have a steady year-round outdoor 9am-noon patio gig in Vegas..we've played the temp gamut between 43-110 degrees..very tough gig sometimes, not to mention the wind on occasion. On the cold gigs a rubber mpc is much more comfortable on a frozen tenor...we are lucky we have shade, so the hot days (like today) ain't too bad, I can use a metal if needed.

Far as reeds go I use mainly Legere or Fibra's, I don't think the xtreme temps affect them much, btw I have found a strong crosswind of 20 mph or higher will pretty much dis-able a Soprano...
 

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I use a JJDV on most gigs...Outdoors in the heat, you'll just have to pull the MPC out... Usually it gets cooler as the evening wears on and you just have to stay on top of it, tuning as you go... Most of my gigs these days are outdoors. It can be brutal. Even in the hot sun, playing can cool off the instrument a bit. This is one of those things where you just have to use your ear.
 
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