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I will shortly be having a fistula created in my left forearm in preparation for dialysis treatments. This is usually located on the palm side of the arm where the veins are accessible. I've been warned not to lift anything heavy, and to protect the fistula from any bumping or damage. I've been playing bari sax for decades, and I'm wondering whether I can continue to do so. I have it in a gig bag, but even then it's about 45 pounds. And to wrestle with it and avoid contact with the left arm in the process is the real reason I'm worried. Has anyone had this situation? I'm concerned that my bari sax playing days might be over. Protecting the fistula (I've been told) basically trumps the handling and usual setup and playing of something as large as the bari.
 

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My suggestion to your problem would be to track down on of thse stands that was made for playing the baritone sax while sitting. I think they were made by Hamilton and had a clamp of sorts that fit on the bell. The base of the stand had wheels to roll out of the way when switching to a different instrument.

These stands were every where thirty years ago. I have no idea if they are still made.

I am also surprised your doctors could not find a better location for your fistula. You are not the first musician I know to have one and they still managed to play all sorts of different instruments.

Good luck on your treatment.

If I find anything that might help you, I will post it here.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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I don't understand why it is 45 lbs for a bari sax in a case. Are you also carrying other stuff and would you have help with transportation and setting up if you could continue? Obviously, you will need expert advice for this but there is a major difference between hand movements needed to operate the left hand keys and to haul the instrument around. I would be surprised if the former was incompatible with a shunt. Perhaps the doctors don't understand the difference or what playing the instrument involves; also not how important it is to you.

I am sorry that you have to go through this and wish you the best of luck.
 

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Forum Contributor 2012, SOTW Saxophone Whisperer,
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As I just bought one recently, the Hamiliton Bari stand is still around and available from Woodwind and Brasswind or Musicians friend.

As a repair tech myself, I've done this before for people, if you can have them solider a neck strap ring on the inside of the bell, then a bassoon strap (the kind you clamp on then sit on) can help take the weight off. It's not a difficult thing for a good tech to do.

Good luck. I am not sure if your situation is more concern of carrying in in the case, or playing it after its set up, but at least that gives you some options after its set up.
 

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Haul your Bari in to the doctor (or tech) that's installing your fistula - explain your problem. They may well have a solution / option that lets you keep playing.
 

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I also recall another type of seated strap thing from a few years ago.
It was a type of stand with a strap hoop attached that took the whole weight of the horn.
I don’t remember what it was called but it may show up in a search?
I know what you are referring to, and I have some pictures of it somewhere, but that device is no longer being made.
I checked into it once.

I second the suggestion about the seated Sax Stick.
I found it cheapest buying from Thomman - approx US$91 plus shipping.
On the Saxrax US store it is $133 plus shipping.
 
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