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https://www.theatlantic.com/science...st-new-instruments-for-the-third-time/525798/

Interesting study. I prefer vintage saxophones myself, but maybe I need to do a blindfold test on a gig.
Unlike with violins, it's almost impossible to do a blindfold test with vintage vs modern saxophones as the player can very often tell which is which due to the action and layout of the key touches. An exception would of course be comparing a vintage MKVI with one of the many modern saxophones based on the MKVI.

Alternatively you could compare vintage instruments modified to have modern keyword, but such an experiment would probably be prohibitively expensive.

It is also further complicated by the fact that (I think) the tonal differences between different makes of violin is minimal, due to a demand for all violins to conform to a well defined violin sound concept, whereas saxophones are designed (or at least marketed) to have quite a broader range of inherent sound quality (dark, bight, spread, focussed, compact, jazz, classical etc.). I'm not aware this is the case with violins, but I could be wrong.

Another point is that when people say "vintage" saxophones, they usually mean saxophones made between around 1920 and 1975, ignoring all those even more vintage saxophones made in the mid to late nineteenth century, which are truly vintage and in most cases incredibly different to those which evolved during the twentieth century. In other words there is a very strong evolutionary path with significant changes that are still continuing, whereas villains have remained relatively constant since the time of Mr Stradivarius.
 
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