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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did a concert/clinic at a high school yesterday, and afterwards one of the alto students brought out his horn for me to try: a silver-plated "The Buescher" True Tone (I think the serial was 151xxx, which Saxpics says makes it a Series II...), and definitely an early ('20s era?) horn: no front-F key, and a pearl for the G#!

And: what a great horn! Till now all I've played have been Aristocrats and my TH&C. This horn had a less spread sound than my TH&C, more reminiscent of my 140, very very nice. *Really* liked the horn, and the kid said he bought it from a local music store for $300! This made me feel disoriented and mentally unstable.

So: these horns ain't typically going for $300, are they?
 

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Yessir, they do.

Maybe not the pristine flawless ones, but even those don't go high. I've got a later one with front F and the crescent G#, it's not my main horn, but it surprises me every time I play it. Mine had the snaps removed and currently plays on plastic resos and sounds drop dead gorgeous!

By yourself one, it's Christmas afterall!!!
 

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So: these horns ain't typically going for $300, are they?
Yeah, you can find some rather nice ones on Ebay that need to be fixed up for around that price. Intonation issues (sharpness above A2) is what probably keeps the prices down. Not all experience it, but if you do, a later Aristocrat neck fixes it.
 

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Probably the best deal in the sax world. I've had one of these (a late '20s model) since high school (40 years!) and I've never played a better alto, although I've owned, and since sold, a couple very good ones (an Aristocrat and a Yam Custom). I haven't experienced the intonation issues, maybe because mine is one of the latest models. These horns have a tone quality that can't be beat.
 

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I bought one a few years ago from an antique dealer. It looked as though someone had swung it like an ax and the lower stack keys were damaged and the body tube dented. But it was a complete horn including all of the snaps. Serial no. 171,XXX. $25.00, obviously unplayable. It was my ambition to "tinker" with it.

About 3 months later I won an ebay auction for a TT alto with no neck. Serial no. 170,XXX. Paid $113.00 and it was as straight as an arrow, again with all of the snaps. I've done nothing to it and although it could use some attention, it plays top to bottom and sounds wonderful.

Regards,

George
 

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I should add that I am convinced that owning that TT way back in high school as my first sax probably was key to keeping me playing for the first few years. Believe it or not, I liked the tone I could get out of it right away. I'm sure it wasn't a great tone on my part, but the horn really had a tone quality that came through even for a relative beginner (I had been playing clarinet since grammar school). Even if I couldn't play much or very well, I liked the sound enough to keep at it. I'm not sure that would have happened with a Yamaganisawa...
 

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The prices are very good on these but go for a series III or IV. I have found that they have better intonation and a more centered sound BUT others see no difference. You can probably find a decent playing one of the later ones for about $600. For reference, I just sold a mint later one on ebay for $940. I currently have a burnished gold plated one and it is the best of the ones I have had. Most are silver and tend to be series II which should be under 200,xxx or so.
 

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The prices are very good on these but go for a series III or IV. I have found that they have better intonation and a more centered sound BUT others see no difference. You can probably find a decent playing one of the later ones for about $600. For reference, I just sold a mint later one on ebay for $940. I currently have a burnished gold plated one and it is the best of the ones I have had. Most are silver and tend to be series II which should be under 200,xxx or so.
That's an exceptional price for eBay; I assume it was in prime playing condition as well?
 

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Well, I bought an 1929 True Tone alto on Ebay for just less than $200 .

I gave it to my repair man, who fixed it up completely for $450.

And man, it's a great alto, beautiful sound, with my Meyer M6 it can sing like a bird and hum like a grumpy old man. With the Berg larsen it howls like a wolf, a wonderfull instrument. And it's in good tune too!!!

So, go for it!!
 

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These really can be amazing horns. There is a reason that with 50 or 60 altos around, I keep coming back to my first True Tone and it's all about the sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There is a reason that with 50 or 60 altos around, I keep coming back to my first True Tone and it's all about the sound.
Because of your hoarding, there are little children in India who go to bed each night without having had a chance to practice....
 

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Because of your hoarding, there are little children in India who go to bed each night without having had a chance to practice....
I think they'd rather practice the chewing...
 

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I think the sopranos are their best horns. I have a sopranino, C soprano and Bb straight Buescher.
The alto I sold for $940 was a complete rebuild with new plating....really nice. That's about what I paid for my gold one.
 

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Probably the best deal in the sax world. I've had one of these (a late '20s model) since high school (40 years!) and I've never played a better alto, although I've owned, and since sold, a couple very good ones (an Aristocrat and a Yam Custom). I haven't experienced the intonation issues, maybe because mine is one of the latest models. These horns have a tone quality that can't be beat.
Lately I played a TT alto, and I was amazed about the sound and the ease of playing!
 

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I have a very nice silver plated (99% plating) series IV (222XXX)that is polished up and ready to rebuild. It as all of the later updates and still has the original pads.

I bought it to rebuild but I just have too much on my plate. If you are interested email me at hutmo at yahoo.com

Very nice dent and trama free saxophone

Merry Christmas
HUTMO
 

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Those altos are hard to beat. I have one I'm trying to sell but I'm just as happy if it stays around. I just used it sitting in with a big band (I play tenor) and found it to be able to handle anything. Mines a 196xxx and it plays in tune well, blends well and cuts when you need it to. Great lil' horn.

Another friend of mine sold his expensive Keilwerth after buying one for $300! He's a professional player....

Why are they so cheap? Simple oversupply. I know of 3 in town hanging on the wall at music stores and know of another 5 for sale in town with private sellers right now. I don't think we'll ever have enough players to give them all new homes!

Enjoy, BB;)
 

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Why are they so cheap? Simple oversupply. I know of 3 in town hanging on the wall at music stores and know of another 5 for sale in town with private sellers right now. I don't think we'll ever have enough players to give them all new homes!

Enjoy, BB;)
Oversupply, and I also think there's a lot of folks--even ones who like vintage horns--who shy away from saxes of the split bell-key era.

(BTW--I'm a proud 227XXX TT alto owner)
 

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Oversupply, and I also think there's a lot of folks--even ones who like vintage horns--who shy away from saxes of the split bell-key era.

(BTW--I'm a proud 227XXX TT alto owner)
I might have done the same if I'd been looking for an alto or tenor. Fortunately, I was hunting for a C-mel when I came across my 1919 True Tone (that's where my picture to the left comes from). With the original neck, it had some really strange intonation and response issues, but what a sound! When I found a slightly later TT (1923), I figured I'd try switching necks to see if it made any difference. Boy did it ever! ALL of the response issues disappeared instantly, and all but two notes fell right in tune. Fortunately those notes were high C# (which can be fixed by having the octave key lower the little LH stack pad halfway), and low C# (which can be fixed with a crescent, impacting nothing else).

The ergonomics were always a stumbling block for me, especially on the pinky cluster. That's why it's in Florida getting the Martin Mods treatment. Sure this turns it from a $300 horn into one several times that cost, but I can't wait to get it back and resume using it as my daily driver.
 
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