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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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6,444 Posts
I made the switch to synthetics after hearing about them here - Legeres work very well for me. A big advantage is for doublers in live situations too as they don't warp and are tough. Another is the consistancy. Over time, I think your playing improves with one less variable in the mix. I have done many side by side comparisons with legeres vs cane. They have a bit more "buzz". Some of us like that. You can also over time train that buzz out of your playing just as you can adjust your tone with other variables. When I first tried them, I went back to cane. Several months later I tried again but I sanded the reed a bit and found a sound I really liked. They run a bit hard. I still used cane in the studio but the legeres were perfect for doubling and especially outside. These days, even though I have at least 30 good to excellent cane reeds from Rico - Hemke - La Voz and everything in between - I never use anything but the Legeres. I guess I'm saying I actually prefer them to cane.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
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6,444 Posts
About thirty cane reeds would net me about 4 or 5 that would actually be vibrant enough to be selected for play in my rotation.
Yet another excellent reason to at least consider synthetic. I'm already on stage by the time you figure out which 4 or 5 might work. I used to go through that same process. It's funny but there are actually numbers and code I've written on all the cane reeds I've kept. Once I figured out how to make synthetics work for me, I felt as if a weight had been lifted from my shoulders. I'm also much more secure in the knowledge that my first note of the night won't be a honker due to the reed. Now I have to blame it on the guitarist.. :)
 
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