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hi- im new here so i dont know all the terms but i havent yet found the info searching by myself.

so i bought a 2 nd hand thomann tenor (yes i know, but seriously the only thing i could afford) i had to adjust a few things when i got it. but at least its in tune!

so instead of felt bumpers it has plastic ones built into the screws. one of them is completly worn out and needs replacing. i havent found any reference to this type of screw. its the one operated by the middle f key.

does anyone know where to get these or what they are called?
i couldnt get a better photo sorry

IMG_4918.jpg
 

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They are called G#/Bis adjusting screws. It is hard to tell from the photo, but some of them have a small "well" at the end that the bumper material is glued into. Try finding a large needle and see if you can dig the remaining portion out. Then get back to us for the next step.
 

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They are called G#/Bis adjusting screws. It is hard to tell from the photo, but some of them have a small "well" at the end that the bumper material is glued into. Try finding a large needle and see if you can dig the remaining portion out. Then get back to us for the next step.
Thanks for the reply!- yep i scooped out the rest of the rubber that was in the "well". what next?
 

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Thanks for the reply!- yep i scooped out the rest of the rubber that was in the "well". what next?
Save that piece of rubber to know what diameter you are going to need. Go to a hardware or plumbing store that sells "o rings" and find one that matches the diameter of your piece. The size doesn't matter, but the larger diameters with have less curve when you cut off a section the length you need. Cut off a piece the correct length to fit inside the adjusting screw and protrude about 1.5 mm beyond the end. Glue it in place using contact cement and you are good to go.
 

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aha! just the right kind of quick cheap fix i was looking for! many thanks saxoclese!
you wouldnt have an idea for my other problem? the low g and a are hard to get out and sometimes jump up an octave.
both the octave pads seems to be sealing ok but i havent tried checking them with cigarette paper or leak light....
or could it be somewhere else?
thanks in advance
 

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aha! just the right kind of quick cheap fix i was looking for! many thanks saxoclese!
you wouldnt have an idea for my other problem? the low g and a are hard to get out and sometimes jump up an octave.
both the octave pads seems to be sealing ok but i havent tried checking them with cigarette paper or leak light....
or could it be somewhere else?
thanks in advance
My best advice would be to get a leak light and check all the pads in a darkened room using light finger pressure on the spring opened keys. Then when you can see what is going on, take it to a tech.
 

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My best advice would be to get a leak light and check all the pads in a darkened room using light finger pressure on the spring opened keys. Then when you can see what is going on, take it to a tech.
will do , thanks for your help!
 

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I regard typical O-ring rubber, as quite unsuitable for this quite precision linkage ... just too squishy.
I prefer to punch out a cylinder from a sheet of "techcork", i.e. neoprene-based "chip-cork" of high quality, and not too long! And glued up the sides of the cavity it lives in.

But yes, some (IMO clueless) manufacturers use rubber. It does not stay on the sax past my workbench, otherwise I could give no guarantee of the reliability of my adjustment workmanship.
 

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Also... The hole in a plastic screw is typically very narrow in diameter. It has to be, in order to give the screw strength. That means the cork has small diameter. That makes its behaviour even more "squishy".

The ideal is a metal screw, with a larger diameter hole, or a flat end on which to glue the "techcork". I sometimes enlarger the diameter of the hole with a round bur in my micromotor.

But plastic saves the manufacturer a couple of cents.
 

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Spud75, two techs, two good tips. Both will work. You’re learning and on a budget. Good to see you’re not shy to ask for help.
Your mechanical abilities are unknown so here’s my read on reasoning below
Saxoclese way is squishy but very forgiving in Repair task and adjusting.
GordonNZ way is a more solid, material takes some finesse, adjusting requires better precision.
Both make it work.

Upgrading to a metal screws is a good move. Just not yet, Learn some then do the tricks. Get the correct thread etc...
It’s easier to remove a damaged plastic one.

You may find a O ring suitable buy asking at a auto repair for old used one, also a scrap of techcork. Have a friend that works on cars?
Make sure to clean off any oil, use some rubbing alcohol or glue will not stick !
The techcork, O rings, contact cement I’ve sourced at automotive parts stores. Not always best $ buy.
Techcork comes in different thickness $3usd for 10x10” flat sheet.

Making adjustments, lots to read. Like mechanical repairs, many ways to do so be open minded.go slow!
http://musicmedic.com/setting-key-heights-with-the-balanced-venting-method
http://musicmedic.com/articles.html
 

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Discussion Starter #11
many thanks for the encouragement! The screws are not plastic- but the bumper part is (or its hard rubber). anyhow no i have no repair experience so saxoclese's advice is great for me. i found exactly the right diameter o ring and it works a treat - not too squshy i find. and in readjusting all that it seems that my octave jumping problem has gone away!

however, using a leak light i see the 3 lowest pads have leaks. i have found this video on youtube https://youtu.be/0VdZgAu3QYA- though its in korean(?) the actions are very clear about how to reseat . but i think its too much for me. buying the right tools are going to cost me the same as getting a pro to do it....
 

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The part you provided a photo of is called an adjusting screw. a "bumper" is quite different. Adjusting screws can be metal or plastic. The fact that your one is black suggests it is plastic.
Adjusting screws are quite different (in design and function) from pivot screws, which incidentally, are always metal.

To me, too squishy means that during use it compresses say 0.1mm or more. The adjustment of the screw that links the F# key (which is above the F key) to the G# key, is critical for the low B & Bb notes sounding easily.
 

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I regard typical O-ring rubber, as quite unsuitable for this quite precision linkage ... just too squishy.
I prefer to punch out a cylinder from a sheet of "techcork", i.e. neoprene-based "chip-cork" of high quality, and not too long! And glued up the sides of the cavity it lives in.

But yes, some (IMO clueless) manufacturers use rubber. It does not stay on the sax past my workbench, otherwise I could give no guarantee of the reliability of my adjustment workmanship.
I do the same "punching out" material from a thick sheet of techcork. I find that spinning the "punch" in my bench motor and bringing the material to it with a suitable backing material makes a cleaner cut. I have however been experimenting with using pieces of neoprene cord from Music Medic which takes much less time to cut and install. I gave the OP the old "O-ring" trick as an easy DIY repair that matches what many of the manufacturers do.
 
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