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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody dealt with this? I got this injury when I started lifting weights again last year and it's doing much better. However, standing is when the pain comes back the most. That makes gigs very difficult. I've been using a stool to keep off my when I'm not playing and try to sit as much as possible when teaching. It's been about 12 months and the progress is so slow but at least it's getting better. Anybody else have this problem before?
 

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I have been dealing with this for the last couple of months and man it is annoying (and painful). I have found that soaking the offending foot in an ice bath for about as long as you can take it and taking Ibuprofin helps tremendously.

Of course, I am no doctor your milage may vary....
 

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Stretching exercises helped me...lifting the front of the foot to stretch the arch and heel, curling my toes, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I found some of the stretches to help tremendously. The typical calf stretches did very little for me. The plantar specific ones made a huge difference. The strange thing is that always the next morning I feel great. It's just getting through an entire gig or recording session that is the killer.
 

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My dad is a podiatric surgeon. He runs into this all the time. Often simply wearing lifts in you shoes that support your arch can relieve almost all of the pain. A well made set of orthotics, casted by a professional, help in the next level of severity. (Also, don't walk around bare-footed; it just aggravates the situation.) In more serious situations, a simple out-patient surgery solves the problem.
 

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I had this problem a while back. Before going to the expense of custom shoe inserts I tried the Dr. Scholls arch supports available at any pharmacy (the full shoe not the half). The inserts plus the stretching exercises made my pain go away completely in two weeks and it hasn't returned. I still use the arch support inserts in every pair of shoes I wear.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have tried a lot of OTC inserts and have been pretty happy with a pair or DownUnders I got at Zappos. I had a recording session this week and was able to make it through with limited pain. However, I went hiking yesterday and didn't fair as well. At least I think I'm on the right track. I definitely think decent inserts and the right shoes can make a world of difference.
 

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Custom orthodics, over the counter inserts, never ever wear cheap shoes, while watching tv place a golf ball under your foot and massage the arch. If you need to lose a few lbs. Mayho
 

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Go to a podiatrist with biomechanical experience. In their assessment they should determine first of all the diagnosis (you say you have had it for a year) as other foot problems can mimic the symptoms (eg tarsal tunnel syndrome - similar to carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist).

Having assessed you biomechanically, they can advise regarding custom orthotic devises (shoe insoles), exercises (stretches such as pulling your toes towards you like an extended calf stretch, rolling a can of drink from the fridge under the arch to cool and stretch and others too).

They should follow you up and advise regarding next steps if no progress. Some people have a steroid injection into the heel where the plantar fascia inserts - though real evidence of its benefit is scant.
 

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I've got it . . . I hate it!

I'm using heel cushions - one pair from a Medical Supply house and recently some blue gel Dr. Scholl's. Both are a big help.
 

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I take that Plantar Fasciitis is what used to be commonly referred to as fallen arches? Gotta hurt.

I've got all kinds of problems going on with my feet. The bones hurt, in an erratic fashion; which is worrisome, probably an age thing. Sometimes my feet seem to change shapes, making my shoes feel lumpy. Plus, I've got a corn on the ball of a big toe.
 

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jazzbluescat said:
I take that Plantar Fasciitis is what used to be commonly referred to as fallen arches? Gotta hurt.

I've got all kinds of problems going on with my feet. The bones hurt, in an erratic fashion; which is worrisome, probably an age thing. Sometimes my feet seem to change shapes, making my shoes feel lumpy. Plus, I've got a corn on the ball of a big toe.
In layman's terms, planar fasciitis is a condition where the fascia (a layer of tissue below the skin) on the bottom of the foot is "too tight". Because of this, it often pulls where it is attached to the heel. This pulling actually results in tearing. The tearing causes pain and also causes the heel bone to start building up calcium deposits at the source of the tear. These deposits are referred to as "heel spurs", but they are an effect of, not a cause of the pain of planar fasciitis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Another thing that I have done which has seemed to help some is go to an activator chiropractor. Activator allows a ver specific adjustment. I has helped biomechanically I think. Another thing I am thinking about is getting a wobble board. It will help increase ankle strength and improve balance which should help me biomechanically as well.
 

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If you stand up in your bare feet, and WITHOUT HELPING THEM let somebody else lift your big toe, what should happen is that your toe should bendwith ease, your arch should rise and your lower leg rotate outwards.

People with the lower leg excessively rotated inwards at rest will notice that the big toe is jammed, will not rise, and nothing happens to the arch or lower leg. If you have a lower leg rotated inwards you are likely to have flat feet/fallen arches, but not always.

When you walk and propel yourself when toeing off in your stride, your big toe bends.

But if you have a jammed big toe because you have fallen arches (as above), then walking will put extra stretching pressure on the arch.

Orthotic insoles can correct the fall of the arch - de-rotate the internally rotated lower leg, and allow the foot to function normally. So when you walk with the correction, the big toe bends easily and the arch rises rather than having excessive forces put through it - that can get transfered to the heel insertion of the plantar fascia which causes plantar fasciitis
 

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TJS said:
Has anybody dealt with this? I got this injury when I started lifting weights again last year and it's doing much better. However, standing is when the pain comes back the most. That makes gigs very difficult. I've been using a stool to keep off my when I'm not playing and try to sit as much as possible when teaching. It's been about 12 months and the progress is so slow but at least it's getting better. Anybody else have this problem before?
I've been dealing with this for years. If I let it go, I soon become almost unable to walk, but I've found a cheap easy way of dealing with it that works wonders for me. Get yourself some golf balls. Wherever you have a workspace where you sit (home office, at work office, in front of the tv, whatever), make sure there's a golf ball within arm's reach.

Now, several times a day, when you're sitting, take off your shoes and place the golf ball under one of your feet. Roll the ball around for about 10 minutes with a fair amount of pressure. You want to press, but you don't want to damage your feet. It WILL hurt some, like a good deep tissue massage hurts. Just roll the ball on each foot for 10-15 minutes to massage the feet. Do this 2-3 times a day.

For me, after about a week, my feet didn't even hurt. After several weeks, as an experiment, I stopped doing the golf ball...within 3 days my feet hurt horribly again. Back to the golf balls and within a few days, pain gone.

Now I do it everyday. If I get out of the habit, I'll notice my feet getting a little sore, I do the balls, pain disappears.

bigtiny
 

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Bigtiny

Excellent way of treating it - but wouldn't it be nice if a podiatrist could offer you prevention, rather than you having to keep treating it?......
 

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I had/have this problem. I found that different shoes could cause a problem. I can't wear Merrell shoes but Keen brand shoes really helped alleviate the pain. Also, check out this website:

http://heelspurs.com/index.html

They show how to tape the bottom of your foot to help support it. Works WAY better than any orthotic or insert.

The other thing you MUST do, is to strengthen your foot. Runners World had a good article on this. One way to strengthen the foot is to lay a towel on the floor, put your feet/foot on it and pull the towel towards you with just your toes, don't move your foot. So, stretch out the toes and then grab with the toes and pull the towel towards you but just with the toes so that the towel bunches up under your foot. This will strengthn the bottom of your foot.

The other thing that worked really well is on the website. It's a sock you go to bed with that pulls the toes towards your shin. This allows your foot to heal at night in a stretched position so that when you put your foot on the floor in the morning your not re-tearing the facia.
 

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the best thing to do to help with this problem is wear a shoe with pleant of arch suporrt. You have to wear it all the time though. Once you let the muscles stretch back out it tears them. You litteraly have to instantly put your feet directly into shoes or slippers in the morning when you get out of bed.

Birkinstock sandals and slippers are the best. They'll last you for ever and lord, are they comfortable.

I work in a shoe store for people with foot problems.
 
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