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Discussion Starter #1
I decided to spoil myself and buy a new mic for my humble recordings as a New Year present.
Looking at it as one time investment for a long period. Sure my playing will not improve, but good gear (as having a pro sax) keeps you up when performing even being far from something serious.
The same is with the cars and any other thing...
Budget wise I feel comfortable with such a purchase.

The web is full of discussions for recording mics and for sax recording/performing in particular. In most cases higher points go toward ElectroVoice RE20.

People discussing cheaper alternatives but only in case of budget question. Didn't find any opinion that says: THIS one is better and cheaper.
Most of them say: save some money and go for RE20.

So, I want to ask here... may be somebody here uses RE20. Is a shock mount is necessary or just a stand adapter will be enough.
What is your overall opinion about RE20?

Thanks.
Michael.
 

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RE20's are sweet. Every time I've been behind one I always feel like they are special. Mostly because of how they are designed. With pretty much any other standard vocal mic as soon as you move a little bit to the side the response to the sound goes out the window. Where as the RE20's pick up the sound in a much bigger bubble. Maybe a little bit of a learning curve I'd say but not too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the input...
Found a discussion about the necessity or shock mount.
Waiting for boxing day... may be some additional rebate will be possible :)
 

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I've been using a RE20 for about 6 yrs. now and no, I don't feel that a shock mount is needed at all. No more than any other mic would "need" a shock mount, that is. Yeah, if you're playing on a hollow stage where people are stomping all over the place, sure.......but I doubt that'll happen too often. The standard adapter/mount that came with mine is fine. My only complaint about it is that because the mic itself is pretty heavy and long, I need to carry screw drivers along with me to tighten it enough so I don't have to give it ****** (if you know what I'm sayin'). ;-)
I'm sure you'll think the mic is a worthy investment!

John

*Edit*.........so you can't type V I A G R A in a post? Good God.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good point about adapter... I didn't use any yet, but thinking about some "bullet proof" (custom made) addition for holding the mic tight (have couple of ideas and technical brother :) ).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
jgreiner, one more question...
how you position the mic? distance from it and where you stay. straight bell to the mic or staying with right hand side of the sax body near the mic?
Sure have to experiment... but there are already few common advises. What is your experience?
 

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I use the RE20 sometimes for recording. It’s my “go-to” mic for upright bass. It’s nice on lots of other things too though, including tenor and Bari sax. You don’t really need the shock mount. The capsule has a ‘blast filter’ that acts as an internal shock mount, and there is a bass roll-off switch that will help tame stage noise as well

It is not my first choice for live work, but they are great mics. Unfortunately you just never know what you are walking into in a live music situation....

For the same reason Little Wailer likes it, it can be problematic on crowded stages.

Maybe buy used, and add an SM 58 to your kit as well. In small rooms with tight stages and cheap PA’s, you’ll be glad you have it - and two good mics are better than one.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Fader.
I have two 58s and a bell attach condenser (wired) made in Holland mic that made some good money :) for good 15 years up to 2008, then I stopped to use it (see pic, may be you know this model).
I want RE-20 for recording.
So answers here just encourage me to buy it. I guess I will see the recording quality change. In case that not... I will like it anyway as an iconic, not high end price mic (as 58 is).
 

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jgreiner, one more question...
how you position the mic? distance from it and where you stay. straight bell to the mic or staying with right hand side of the sax body near the mic?
Sure have to experiment... but there are already few common advises. What is your experience?
I stand behind it pretty much like any other mic I'd use. That is, usually pretty close to the bell.....within 4-6 inches or so. Yes, definitely experiment, but I've found that works best for me. I also LOVE it as a clarinet mic as it does have a wide pickup range.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thx.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I used to use an RE20 for live and recording. It is a great mic. I don't think a shock mount is an absolute necessity, but won't do any harm at all. From what I remember it may need a bit more gain than some other mics so good pre amp will be a bonus.

Aswell as saxophone I got some great result on drums, worked well on bass drum and also snare (but not that easy to keep out of the way of sticks! Also good on guitar amps.
 

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Make sure you have a good mic stand and the clip is tight. RE20s are HEAVY.
 

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I don’t think a shock mount is needed. As stated above, they are heavy so making sure you don’t send them too far out on a boom arm and have the stand base balanced and solid is important. You don’t want yours to look like mine with the dented front screen. As Fader said, I had too much bleed in from the sides and have fond the Beyerdynamic 201M to have a narrower more forgiving pattern. Also, I found a Cloudlifter preamp to be a simple solution to its low output, but it isn’t needed all the time. Right now it seems to be a great match for our drummer’s vocals (with a very beefy boom stand), and it made a great drum overhead mic at times in the past.
 

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I've done a couple recordings with an RE20 (in a pro studio, so presumably they had good electronics), and a shock mount was not used. Of course the floor was cement, so no boomy noise transmitted that way... It sounded fine.

I'm curious why you are set on an RE20, though. Most people in home studios - I'm assuming you will be using it at home - use a large diaphragm condenser. Good quality ones (I like the AKG C214; many ppl like AT mics) are priced about the same or less than the RE20. I'm not objecting, the RE20 is certainly a good mic, but I'm curious :)

(Edit...) Also, someone mentioned standing 4 - 6 inches from the mic. In the studio where I recorded, both in a horn section and overdubbing solos, I was about 24 - 30 inches away (similar to a condenser), and the sound was good in a pretty dead room. Again, I had no insight into the gain settings or the pre-amps used. So I would experiment with mic placement.
 

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One of the selling points of the RE20 is that its designed to minimize proximity effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks to all.

After Steve's mention of C214 checked a topic EV vs AKG... In my situation a dynamic mic will be more appropriate -minimization of proximity effect mentioned by hakukani (the room where I record is far from being a designed studio).

Here is one of the similar answers to the guy who asked for comparison of C214 and RE-20:

"the condenser will definitely give you a more detailed sound. the above post is correct about which mics are used for big-time voice-over work, however the RE-20 is a staple in the broadcast booth and will meet your needs.

the bigger issue here is Acoustic Treatment and the AKG will pick up a lot more of your room. if that is an undesirable sound, it will result in poor recordings and more work in post. if you can afford to properly treat your room, then the AKG will be a serviceable mic. if not, then go with the RE-20, which will do a better job of taking your room out of the picture".
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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the bigger issue here is Acoustic Treatment and the AKG will pick up a lot more of your room. if that is an undesirable sound, it will result in poor recordings and more work in post. .
I agree with the second bit of that, but I can't see why a 214 would pick up more room, as it is also cardioid. The problems you mention re: rooms are more likely to be an issue for home studios when ribbon or omni mics are used.

My own experience is that the extra detail you may get with condensers can be very relevant for solo instruments, but in your average mix that details gets lost anyway. I've done top end studio recordings with mics such as SM58, although having said that my go-to now in my own studio is an AKG C12VR - but only because I also have the means to filter that extra detail when it becomes a double edged sword. So I might end up with something I could have got with the good old RE20 at a tenth of the price!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Pete,
after your input, I am getting a bit confused :), in good sense...

you mention 58.

Yesterday, after watching couple of youtube mic related videos from knowledgeable people - studio guys, related to particularly sax recording, I did record using 58.
What I changed following some well known advises (I was sure that it will not give any good before trying):
I positioned 58 in the middle of sax body and stayed about 20cm from it.

I found that recording was good, sure not worst than when I put the bell on edge of 58. Yes I added gain a bit.
Was so surprised... Vocalists chewing 58 usually...

Now I am a bit in doubt again, should I buy RE20 until some testing. As mentioned at the beginning, the budget for this mic not bugging me.
From the other hand I like to use technical stuff that will do real things. Finally a mic is not a statue :).

May be will try to arrange some comparison to be sure that the money will go right way for me.

Thanks.
 
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