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Discussion Starter #1
Holy hell, why did no one tell me it was possible to move from C#1 to Bb1 and back on the 400 pinkie table by just rolling straight across the B key? All this time learning my TH&C's mechanism I've been trying to do it by sliding from the C# down to the Bb, which is incredibly awkward because of the lack of roller, and the fact Bb doesn't extend down next to the C#.

Now the rest of y'all will laugh at me for not having figured it out sooner. ;-P

(It's actually kind of an ingenious mechanism, and I like it a LOT better than the table setup on my Mk. VI. I could never get the angle of the Bb spatula adjusted right and there was always a big vertical gap)
 

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Alto sax, Tenor sax, Clarinet
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I play Bueschers and Conns with the 3 in line C#-B-Bb pinky tables, and I prefer that layout to the Selmer type. But I did dislocate my left pinky finger and it healed with a kink at the knuckle that makes the Selmer type table a problem for me.
Don't feel bad about not seeing this right away. I think it really only works because the B1 key takes some force to move. If it moved easily, you might get a muddy transition.
If you like the 3-in-line table, take a look at the 10M and 6M tables. The C#1 to Bb1 maneuver is even easier on the Conns IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's probably the reason I never tried it; I'd thought that if I tried to slide from C# to Bb across the B key I'd end up with a chromatic grace note down, rather than a clean transition from C# to Bb. I only discovered it worked while practicing Eb minor scales, and my finger slipped while running the extended scale through the bottom end of the horn (played C#, meant to play B, but dropped all the way to Bb instead, lol).
 

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On my horn the B is slightly lower than the C# and Bb keys...makes it easy to find so when I had the horn worked on I told them to leave it that way ( they said they normally would make them all equal height ).

Not sure if I prefer it to Selmer, but I like it. The arrangement is great...kinda wish the table was in a better spot, but it's easier to get used to than I expected
 

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I play a King Zephyr tenor and a Beuscher 400 bari, I also prefer the old style pinky table. I learned sax on a 1920's King, and since, have never been that comfortable with the Selmer style pinky table. I have been trying out a friend's SBA and can't quite get over wanting to reach across the table to hit the Bb. I find it more "natural" to reach across than to move my pinky down. I suppose if I had learned on a Yamaha, it would be the opposite case.
 

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I believe the old style table design (3 in a row) is better suited to the actual anatomy of the human hand than the Selmer style. I've written extensively about this.

Obviously there are many thousands of players who disagree with me, so I'm not going to get too rambunctious about it.
 

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I believe the old style table design (3 in a row) is better suited to the actual anatomy of the human hand than the Selmer style. I've written extensively about this.

Obviously there are many thousands of players who disagree with me, so I'm not going to get too rambunctious about it.
Fear not! You're not alone!
 

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I've been alternating between my Buescher tenors (156 & series one) and my MkVI for a fair number of years now and I have to admit I've never had much problem or given much thought to the slight difference in how the left hand pinky keys operate on the Selmer vs the Buescher. It feels pretty natural either way. But turf may well be right about the anatomy of the hand being more suited to the layout of those keys on the Buescher; he'll get no argument from me.

I put this down to the minor differences in ergos from one horn to another and the need to make some adjustments when switching horns. The right hand side keys on a Buescher are also different from the VI (they are a bit higher). While I do prefer the action on the VI, overall it's fairly easy to adjust going from one horn to the next.
 
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