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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings, all,

I recently did some work on a pair of Conn Tenors that had the G# trill key and thought to myself "Man, this mechanism works so much better than the ones on a Buescher." So I decided that I'd like to mod my TT C-Mel to have a Conn-style G# Trill.

Here's what I need: 1) Some detailed pics of the Conn's mechanism (as I didn't take any and those saxes were sold about a month ago) on the front and back of the horn. 2) Any tips, tricks, hints or stories of similar experiences that any of y'all might have.

Many thanks,

Josh
 

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Does the Conn G-Ab trill key lift the G# pad cup when you press it?

If so, you'll probably have to make and fit a piece of keywork that's mounted between a new set of pillars to lift the G# pad cup.
 

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Thats not a simple process. Cut the G# key Bridge at the pad cup tube. Twist around the bridge to opposite the pearl and add 2 posts and a rocker key. Will take a while to find the right spot and height for the new rocker and making sure nothing interferes.
 

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Thats not a simple process. Cut the G# key Bridge at the pad cup tube. Twist around the bridge to opposite the pearl and add 2 posts and a rocker key. Will take a while to find the right spot and height for the new rocker and making sure nothing interferes.
A rocker key mounted on posts would work but isn't necessary. Separate (cut) the G# pad cup from the trill touchpiece. Braze an extension onto the G# trill touchpiece which, when pressed, should lift up an extension brazed onto the pinky G# lever.

I have a Conn 10M with this setup and a 1930's Aristocrat alto with the same G# trill (opposite of the TT style). Both are factory original equipment. No rocker key in either installation.

Not a simple process for a DIY'er but certainly within the scope of a minor job for a tech.

I'll try to take pictures of how my Aristocrat alto is set up...might take a day or so...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
SFH, I'm apprenticing with a tech right now, so trying new things and being bold with one of my own horns is a challenge that I look forward to. Thanks for input, all.
 

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SFH, I'm apprenticing with a tech right now, so trying new things and being bold with one of my own horns is a challenge that I look forward to.
You guys should be able to do this quickly. As promised, pictures from a 272xxx Aristocrat alto...

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The touch piece on the G# is on the same side as the foot that closes the pad cup. It pushes the G# pad cup foot up, as it is opposite the pad cup. All of that is backwards from modern horn setups. You will need to reverse the direction of force to get the 2nd touch piece to open the key it was designed to close.
 

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The touch piece on the G# is on the same side as the foot that closes the pad cup. It pushes the G# pad cup foot up, as it is opposite the pad cup.
If you split the G# pad cup from the trill touch piece, so there are two separate keys, you can change this relationship. Check out how Buescher "rewired" this setup in post #9.

As far as your previous assertion that a rocker arm is needed, you're correct. In this instance, the G# trill touch piece is the rocker arm, prying up the G# pinky lever from the opposite side of the circle (farthest away from the trill touch piece), which effectively pushes the pinky touch piece down.

Even though Buescher's G# pinky key, like other vintage American saxes, rotates in the opposite direction of a Selmer or other modern horn, the setup works. Quite well, I might add.

Again, this is the original factory setup, not some custom mod that I (or any other tech) did to the horn. But I were modifying a True Tone to behave this way (to reverse the function of the trill key), I'd definitely use Buescher's example for its simplicity.
 

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I see what what was done now, but it will be tough to thread an arm under the G# and have all the motion needed. They also moved the bridge to the other side of the G#/F# post, so there may be a key in the way if you just split the hinge tube. All completely doable but not a job that will be done quickly.
 

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I see what what was done now, but it will be tough to thread an arm under the G# and have all the motion needed.
This is how Buescher did it...

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Basically they used a very low-profile (flattened) arm that goes under the G#. There's enough room for 1/32" cork on both the top and bottom of the arm. On the Aristocrat alto I own, the trill key has a full range of motion; the G# pinky lever goes down all the way when pressing the trill key. No metal-on-metal contact anywhere.

They also moved the bridge to the other side of the G#/F# post, so there may be a key in the way if you just split the hinge tube.
I'm looking at my TT C melody right now. There's easily enough room in all directions to leave the bridge key where it is (next to the G# cup) and otherwise follow the Aristocrat plans. However, it's pretty obvious that the spring cradle on the G# pad cup would need to be moved slightly north because it's right next to the bridge you'd need to separate from the G# pad cup. Simply another opportunity for the OP to use his silver-soldering skills...

All completely doable but not a job that will be done quickly.
Guess it depends on the definition of "quickly."

I'll revise my previous comment: "you guys should be able to do this successfully." It's definitely "doable." :mrgreen:
 
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