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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm really trying to take pentatonics to the next level. My summer goal is to get these under my fingers better with Bergonzi's book.

Bergonzi has a very nice demo of him ripping through pentatonics in an interesting way.

Would you please post any concepts/approaches/clips (from youtube, for example) that features an interesting sax solo using pentatonics.
 

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Just about every solo trane played from the Giant steps era was heavily saturated with pentatonics. One cool pentatonic scale that he liked to use was 1,2, min3,5,Maj6. I don't remember the particular name of the scale, but it's just like a major pentatonic but with a min 3rd.
Maybe this is a better example;

In the Key of C
C,D,Eb,G,A
 

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paulbrodt said:
Just about every solo trane played from the Giant steps era was heavily saturated with pentatonics. One cool pentatonic scale that he liked to use was 1,2, min3,5,Maj6. I don't remember the particular name of the scale, but it's just like a major pentatonic but with a min 3rd.
Maybe this is a better example;

In the Key of C
C,D,Eb,G,A
That's a really cool pentatonic. I use it all the time. It works well in a blues setting for sure. Try playing it in a descending fashion from the 6th. I think maybe Bergonzi has some sort of name for this scale. It's obviously a version of a minor pentatonic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
paulbrodt said:
Just about every solo trane played from the Giant steps era was heavily saturated with pentatonics. One cool pentatonic scale that he liked to use was 1,2, min3,5,Maj6. I don't remember the particular name of the scale, but it's just like a major pentatonic but with a min 3rd.
Maybe this is a better example;

In the Key of C
C,D,Eb,G,A
Very cool. I can see that working nice over an F7.
 

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I am ignorant, I admit it. This just looks like a major blues
scale lacking it's major 3rd (E in the example.)
I'm open to being shown why it is more complicated than that.
 

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Would you pls explain it further more?
Why anything works on a X7?
Thanks you~
 

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Lorentz said:
Would you pls explain it further more?
Why anything works on a X7?
Thanks you~
Not the most helpful of answers but I think he means the old cliche ' there are no wrong notes ...'
 

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rabbit said:
This just looks like a major blues scale lacking it's major 3rd (E in the example.)
I'm open to being shown why it is more complicated than that.
Actually, it's not at any more complicated than that. Except without the maj 3rd, it is no longer a major blues scale. The sound is different with the major third. Plus of course you can't play that maj 3rd (the E nat) over an F7 chord, except as a passing tone. And you don't want that maj 3rd when improvising over a C min tonality, etc.

In many cases, changing just one note can make a huge difference.
 

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I'm really trying to take pentatonics to the next level. My summer goal is to get these under my fingers better with Bergonzi's book.

Bergonzi has a very nice demo of him ripping through pentatonics in an interesting way.
In resonse to your original question, I would suggest listening to Tom Scott. I just did a transcription of his work on Carole King's Jazzman. Almost entirely pentatonic, however, still interesting.

Dan
 

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rabbit said:
I'm open to being shown why it is more complicated than that.
Don't sweat it. I always considered pentatonics to be an attempt to make things less complicated.

Ever try sitting at a keyboard and playing just the black keys? Can't play a "wrong" note if you try. Complicated does not always mean better (I realize that you probably know that).
 

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Its called the incen scale and its way cool in my book. The main reason its different to the blues scale is that in the blues scale the minor third is often treated as a passing note, but this is very much a minor sound.

The incen scales is a traditional japanese scale. like may traditional scales (but not the modern jazz scales I know of) this is different on the way up to the way down. Its also generally played as the second mode of the scale posted by paulbrodt:

D, Eb, G, A, C, D, Bb, A, G, Eb, D

Why aren't there jazz scales have this property anyone? I know of at least 3 VERY cool scales which are like this and there are innumerable indian scales (which I'm hoping to get to grips with!).
 

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sinkdraiN said:
I'm really trying to take pentatonics to the next level. My summer goal is to get these under my fingers better with Bergonzi's book.

Bergonzi has a very nice demo of him ripping through pentatonics in an interesting way.

Would you please post any clips (from youtube, for example) that features an interesting sax solo using pentatonics.

- TRY THIS MORE _ADVANCED_PENT OVER ... A 7 ; E dim 7 ; C7 ;
c#min-maj 7 ; F#7 etc

The scale is - C / D# / E / F# / G //

hAVE FUN !:cool:
 

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rabbit said:
I am ignorant, I admit it. This just looks like a major blues
scale lacking it's major 3rd (E in the example.)
I'm open to being shown why it is more complicated than that.
It's not that it's more complicated, it's just a different sound that you don't hear as much. To me, in a minor chord my favorite color tones are the Maj6 and the 9. And this pentatonic has both of them in it where as the traditional minor pentatonic has neither.
 

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Dave Sanborn uses lots of pentatonic licks, and plays them in a very musical, soulful way. Check him out.

Slightly off topic: For those of you who are looking for a very thorough study of pentatonic scales, I highly recommend a book by Ed Petersen. Ed is a great tenor player (lived in Chicago for many years, now teaching a U of New Orleans), and his book includes a catalog of every possible collection of five pitches! After laying out all 330 possible pentatonic scales, Ed highlights a few of them, and suggests various harmonic uses for them. He later gives examples of how to play "in and out" by using melodic shapes from different scales. You can download the whole book to preview for free (unable to print), and purchase a printable version for just $10. Check it out at:
http://jazz-ed.net/page5.html

Note: I have no financial interest. It's just a great resource, written by a great guy!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Lorentz said:
Would you pls explain it further more?
Why anything works on a X7?
Thanks you~
Dominant 7th are "tension" chords that like to resolve. Even dissonant notes sound good because they add to the tension. So, yes technically...anything works over a Dom7th...
 

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The Dom7th is "going" somewhere. You should never resolve anything as it is going somewhere and that's what makes it interesting.
 
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