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Penn had some hard rubber pieces that used the same blank as "Selmer New York Elkhart" . Folklore has it that this blank was the same blank as the Supersonic. You see these blanks occaisionally with any number of maker's stamps on them. Bundy, Penn, Buescher, Selmer, Masterlay, etc.
 

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Penn woodwind mouthpieces were the trademark of Pennino Music Co. Inc., founded by Jeanette Pennino in the late 1940's with offices and warehouse at 1732-42 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles. One of the largest and "most progressive wholesalers on the Pacific Coast" (according to their advertisements). They had an extensive array of house- branded Penn musical items and were an exclusive distributor of house-branded Pierre Meure saxophones (probably an Orsi stencil), along with Leblanc, Getzen, Rico reeds, and others. They had house-branded Penn guitars (produced by United Guitar Corporation) and amplifiers stenciled for them, now collectible.

I think that this particular white plastic blank is a fairly common JJ Babbitt offering with a standard Babbitt facing and likely even Babbitt providing the Penn embossment. The same blank could have been used by Dukoff and many others. Whether or not it plays like a Dukoff (or better) depends on the ultimate workmanship. Other examples here.

Or it could be a collaboration between Bob Dukoff and Arnold Brilhart to produce a saxophone mouthpiece (for Sean Penn?)
 

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Sellers listings like this are the cause of much confusion and mis-information. Either mistakenly or intentionally. I suspect the latter.
Clearly this is a black plastic blank the same as the OP's white example. The reason the seller thinks this has some sort of relationship with Dukoff supersonic is purely because if these mouthpieces here:


The "supersonic" blanks are hard rubber and look like this. Like I said these blanks also come with a hand-full of different companies logos stamped on them. Like Mark said, these are Babbitt blanks I think.
 

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I think that this particular white plastic blank is a fairly common JJ Babbitt offering with a standard Babbitt facing and likely even Babbitt providing the Penn embossment. The same blank could have been used by Dukoff and many others. Whether or not it plays like a Dukoff (or better) depends on the ultimate workmanship. Other examples here.
I've got one of these 'other examples'. It's marked Revere. It's got a small opening, but a wonderful facing. It plays absolutely fantastically well, but it's a bit small for me.
 

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Yep, I've got one of those marked "C.Bruno Artist". Johnny Hodges' last mouthpiece appears to have been one like mine (though I bet his wasn't a #2 opening). I still don't sound like him when I play it.

Perfectly functional mouthpieces, punch way above their weight performance-wise, and if it just had the right stamping on it, it'd be worth hundreds of bucks. As is? It's worth bucks. Like, ten of them.
 

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Like Mark said, these are Babbitt blanks I think. <
Yeah, it's the old "It's really a Dukoff" sales pitch. Changes the value from $19 to $199. Why did Dukoff stamp some of them Penn and Bundy and Medallion and Selmer and Harmony and Revere and Coast and C. Bruno, etc., etc? I'd like the Dukoff experts to explain that to me.
 

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Penn woodwind mouthpieces were the trademark of Pennino Music Co. Inc., founded by Jeanette Pennino in the late 1940's with offices and warehouse at 1732-42 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles. One of the largest and "most progressive wholesalers on the Pacific Coast" (according to their advertisements). They had an extensive array of house- branded Penn musical items and were an exclusive distributor of house-branded Pierre Meure saxophones (probably an Orsi stencil), along with Leblanc, Getzen, Rico reeds, and others. They had house-branded Penn guitars (produced by United Guitar Corporation) and amplifiers stenciled for them, now collectible.

I think that this particular white plastic blank is a fairly common JJ Babbitt offering with a standard Babbitt facing and likely even Babbitt providing the Penn embossment. The same blank could have been used by Dukoff and many others. Whether or not it plays like a Dukoff (or better) depends on the ultimate workmanship. Other examples here.

Or it could be a collaboration between Bob Dukoff and Arnold Brilhart to produce a saxophone mouthpiece (for Sean Penn?)
I know that Babbitt molded lots of parts for various companies over the years in ebonite/hard rubber but some of those early plastic pieces seem very much like Runyon pieces. Do we know if Babbitt ever produced plastic parts or is this hypothetical. I only ask because I think you've done a lot more research than I have on the subject.
 

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True, it could be something "produced" by Brilhart or Runyon. I don't know if there is anybody left at JJ Babbitt to know when they first started injection molding mouthpieces. Injection molding wasn't anything that showed up on their website when I last looked at it (a decade ago). I also don't know if Babbitt kept a record of their offerings over the years and whether they would share that knowledge.

As to what Brilhart and Runyon "produced," I don't think it is likely that either fully produced mouthpieces start to finish in house. The time, expense, and expertise of injection molding little plastic doodads is something that would be best jobbed out to a business specializing in molding little plastic doodads. It doesn't pencil out to have a production run of 1,000 injection molded mouthpieces if you have to purchase the equipment, rent space, source materials, etc. Just take your mold to a business that already does that. Then the woodwind player (Brilhart, Runyon, Dukoff) can tweak the little plastic doodad into a great mouthpiece. No need to be woodwind player/chemist/engineer/machinist/materials science expert.

Judy Beechler might be the last one around who has the historical knowledge. Her dad (Elmer) worked for Arnold Brilhart in the early days of injection molding (in NY) before starting his own business (in CA). He later did some work for Rico when Rico dropped the ebonite Gregory line of mouthpieces and went with the injection molded Reloplex (probably an improvement, but nobody famous played a Reloplex). She might know if Remle Musical Products actually injection molded in house on their own equipment. She might even know if Brilhart and Runyon did. And she might also know if it was common for others to follow the JJ Babbitt model and sell blanks.
 

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True, it could be something "produced" by Brilhart or Runyon. I don't know if there is anybody left at JJ Babbitt to know when they first started injection molding mouthpieces. Injection molding wasn't anything that showed up on their website when I last looked at it (a decade ago). I also don't know if Babbitt kept a record of their offerings over the years and whether they would share that knowledge.

As to what Brilhart and Runyon "produced," I don't think it is likely that either fully produced mouthpieces start to finish in house. The time, expense, and expertise of injection molding little plastic doodads is something that would be best jobbed out to a business specializing in molding little plastic doodads. It doesn't pencil out to have a production run of 1,000 injection molded mouthpieces if you have to purchase the equipment, rent space, source materials, etc. Just take your mold to a business that already does that. Then the woodwind player (Brilhart, Runyon, Dukoff) can tweak the little plastic doodad into a great mouthpiece. No need to be woodwind player/chemist/engineer/machinist/materials science expert.

Judy Beechler might be the last one around who has the historical knowledge. Her dad (Elmer) worked for Arnold Brilhart in the early days of injection molding (in NY) before starting his own business (in CA). He later did some work for Rico when Rico dropped the ebonite Gregory line of mouthpieces and went with the injection molded Reloplex (probably an improvement, but nobody famous played a Reloplex). She might know if Remle Musical Products actually injection molded in house on their own equipment. She might even know if Brilhart and Runyon did. And she might also know if it was common for others to follow the JJ Babbitt model and sell blanks.
Babbitt's current website certainly says that they make plastic mouthpieces (with pictures of equipment). I sort of assumed that many of the house brand and clarinet/sax branded plastic mouthpieces (Revere, Bundy, etc) from the 50s-60s or so came from Babbitt. Occasionally you see one that actually says Babbitt on it, but no way to date it.

Recently I was looking at Otto (Saxmundstykker)'s Brilhart website Brillys with serial numbers and on the front page he has a historical photo of the "Brilhart Plastics Corporation" plant and their promo sheet offering manufacturing including molding and finishing of plastic parts for industry, well outside the saxophone market, including military and various aircraft companies. This fits with other things I've read that Arnold Brilhart himself was something of a leader in injection molding.

The sell-off of the Runyon factory stuff a year or so ago showed that they had lots of heavy equipment, I don't remember if there were actually molding machines for sale. I read somewhere the claim that in the later years, long after Selmer had bought Brilhart, that the Selmer Brilharts were actually made by Runyon. I don't know if this is true, but it sort of fits with the fact that the supply of new plastic Brilhart mouthpieces seems to have dried up just a few years ago (?) some time after the Runyon business stopped.
 
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