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I'm practicing Paul Creston's Sonata op.19 and I 'm wondering if anybody has some tips about how to produce the G in third octave in the first movement. I know about the Roussau book(I'm working on it) but any advice is welcomed.
 

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SOTW Columnist and Forum Contributor 2015-2016
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Try to see which fingerings work for you. Some people play it with B, G, F, and D main stack keys pressed down....others like myself use Fork F, regular F, and side Bb pressed down.

No matter what, always work out the sequence when you're playing the G...it's a much different beast to simply "play an alt. G" than to build into the with the phrase.

Just remember that it needs to be strong, clear, and in tune. That G is the climax of that entire section, and arguably of the entire movement. It needs to be powerful and moving.

Good luck!

Saxaholic
 

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Remeber not to be afraid of the tone. First you must hear it in your head before anything will come out on the horn( play it an octave below and then hear that octave leap in your head). I would suggest practicing out of the top tones book ( by Sigurd Rascher) for extended study. However, if you need to get this G out soon for a performance, I would suggest trying to get out higher atlissmo notes first. Try A,Bb or B. Those are easier to produce. Another thing to remember is that you already know how to play altissimo. Its simply overblowing the tones to produce what I like to call " refined sqweaks". So never tell yourself that its impossible and that you simply cannot get it out.
 
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