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Discussion Starter #1
New can of works here. Am going to get either one. I understand setup-mouthpiece-reed choice etc is all sound related, and that is not what I want to address. What I do want to address is the exacting science, and craftsmanship of the instrument. Example, up to a certain Ser.# the Mark V1 was the Icon of craftsmanship. But as the oldschool masters were lost, so also was the quality of what the Mark V1 was, thus the search for the great Ser# and the disdain for others. With todays new lasers, CNC tooling, but lastly, the masters touch for the fine detail,,,, anyone care to share some knowledge that may have obtained on these topics. Thanks.
 

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Yep, definitely opened up a new can of "works"! Huh? I am totally confused.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Desax said:
Example, up to a certain Ser.# the Mark V1 was the Icon of craftsmanship. But as the oldschool masters were lost, so also was the quality of what the Mark V1 was, thus the search for the great Ser# and the disdain for others.
I think that's more to do with a collectors rather than players. There are good and bad MKVIs from any era. I had a really bad MKVI tenor with ahighly collectable serial number. It was rotten, out of tune, nasty. I've played some much later models that are great horns.
 

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Back in '86 I took a summer job to save up for a pro sax. The Yana Elimona with no high F# was the cheapest horn I could get new. Now I'm way older and can afford pretty much any new horn, but I wont replace the Elimona. Probably something to do with us growing up together I guess. Otherwise I'm Selmer (clarinet, tenor). Yana sops have a well-deserved rep for goodness.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will try again

Taiwan builds a lot of horns, even selmers. China as everyone knows is even building horns, but under some brand names are shipped back to Taiwan for tweaking and finishing (to the experts I suppose). Selmer Paris is not built in Taiwan. So back to the point, is anyone schooled as to whom is building the better horn in regards to final grand craftsmanship? Thanks.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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It may come as a surprise, but many of the high quality saxophones being made in China now are actually hand made from start to finish.
 

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Desax, are you asking for a comparison between Mk VI and current Yanagisawa models or Serie III vs Yanagisawa? It's all been discussed in depth many times over - the Search function will help you retrieve archival information.

Bottom line: Mk VIs were great tenors. Serie III are great sops but have mechanical issues for some and are heavy. Yanagisawa makes great sops and has done so for a long time.

I've had some of each (and many other sops) and now own only a SC992.
 

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Yes, I too am confused about the intent of the opening post.

I agree with Dr. G - I've owned a MKVI soprano, a Serie III soprano (neither Selmer still owned by me), and a BUNCH of others. I count my S992 Yanagisawa among the best sopranos out there and clearly one of the two best in my closet at the time. DAVE
 

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I really don't get it either:

What I do want to address is the exacting science, and craftsmanship of the instrument. Example, up to a certain Ser.# the Mark V1 was the Icon of craftsmanship. But as the oldschool masters were lost, so also was the quality of what the Mark V1 was, thus the search for the great Ser# and the disdain for others.
What old schoolmasters? We understand more about manufacturing, metalurgy, materials, mechanical engineering, and everything else than we did fifty years ago.
 

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I guess my take on the Mark 6 sop is the palm keys. The high D, E, and F are really hard to access. I know that Yani was big on copying Selmer so the old Elimona soprano has those same style of palm keys. I played a Mark 6 sop for a little while. It sounded great, until I tried to access those tricky palm keys. Has anyone noticed that they don't make new sopranos with that style of palm keys anymore? I have a feeling there's a reason behind that.
 

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We'll see what they do with a reissue. The Serie III tenors have high palm keys but they went back to near-vintage positions (that I prefer) on the Ref horns.
 

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I'd say that Yana rocked the foundation of soprano construction when they released the 880. At that time Selmer realised they had to do something about those snake charmers as well. It seems to me that Selmer never put their heart into sopranos until the Series III, which I find is a great horn.
BTW, I play the 880SG. Happy as can be, but that Sereis III I played some time back was tempting... :)

<edit>
What I tried to say is that when it comes to altos and tenors everytone tries to copy Selmer (Mark VI?) but when it comes to sopranos everyone seems to try to copy the 880/990/991.
</edit>
 

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Forum Contributor 2016, The official SOTW Little S
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More people are becoming die-hard Yani fans. I think you would have no regrets purchasing the Yani.
 

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When it comes to Sopranos, Yani reigns king in my view and from my experience. The mechanics, tone and intonation are second to none.

The Selmer III is a nice sounding soprano but extremely hard to regulate the mechanics without taking the darn thing apart. I have found some good ones from time to time, however, Yani's are still preferred all around.
 
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