Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Who has one..First question

Up until recently Ive used a small modified cabinet with an overhead kitchen extraction fan for doing my relacquers.

It has become very restrictive of late, a higher demand for multiple on the go jobs is needed, and I have decided today is the day to start building a full paint booth.

Anyone got some photos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Steve? That's the size of the entire workshop many of these guys work from!

If you weren't in the most isolated capital city in the world, they'd be rounding up a lynch mob right now!!!

KennyD
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
593 Posts
Im suprised there is much of a market for relaquering. i thouhgt it might change the sound somewhat. ive seen plenty of people using old looking horns because they like the sound.

that does look like a nice project though.
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Well, the fruits of my labour on the first day. 3.3m by 3.3m by 2.4m high or for the imperial minded 11ft by 11ft by 8ft high
The Ferree's catalog use to have a paint/lacquer room outline in the catalog. The paint room we had in the repair shop in Elkhart was about 1/2 the size as your frame work. We had filtered openings at one end that used "stock" furnace filters on the inlet to filter the air. Explosion proof fan and large explosion proof lights at the other end. The end nearest the inlet filters also housed an oven made for baking on the epoxy finish we used. These are easy to make as well.

If I were going to do this again, I would probably look at one of the paint booths that Grizzly tools sells.

Good luck with the paint room. Be careful, the local lighting and antique people will be wanting you to polish and lacquer brass fixtures if you aren't careful.

Matt
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
Be careful, the local lighting and antique people will be wanting you to polish and lacquer brass fixtures if you aren't careful.
I always made more money doing antiques and decorative brass. You don't have to deal with dents or soldering and they didn't have to be a shiny as a horn, they just wanted the epoxy coating.
I was the only one doing it so I could charge whatever I wanted.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I always made more money doing antiques and decorative brass. You don't have to deal with dents or soldering and they didn't have to be a shiny as a horn, they just wanted the epoxy coating.
I was the only one doing it so I could charge whatever I wanted.
Nice, never even thought of that.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The Ferree's catalog use to have a paint/lacquer room outline in the catalog. The paint room we had in the repair shop in Elkhart was about 1/2 the size as your frame work. We had filtered openings at one end that used "stock" furnace filters on the inlet to filter the air. Explosion proof fan and large explosion proof lights at the other end. The end nearest the inlet filters also housed an oven made for baking on the epoxy finish we used. These are easy to make as well.
My old man, retired farmer now, used to be a spray painter, so I grew up around paint shops and painted many a car. Ive got to get it EPA approved so its getting proper extraction / filters / breathing gear etc. Not a small undertaking. Welding up the booth is the easy part, the hard part is fitting it out properly..
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
Our shop did many antiques as well. There was a pretty active antique car collectors club in the area that generated us a lot of business too. I always hated doing these, but they can be a good money maker. FWIW, if you end up doing this kind of work, get the customer to disassemble the items with lots of parts and have them take a picture of the entire inventory of parts. Old lamps have a lot of parts and require lots of extra ( IMO not fun) assembly time. Recently I opened my big mouth to a colleague and ended up polishing aluminum motor cycle parts for him.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I got the booth roof up today, man I field old. Havent worked this hard in ages, no more work on it until next weekend however, back to repairs tommorrow
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
My favorite were brass beds, they really look nice all polished up.
Paul, how do you buff a brass bed

Recently I opened my big mouth to a colleague and ended up polishing aluminum motor cycle parts for him.
Buffed aluminium always looks nice, lacquering them is like lacquering brass an artform all of its own..
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
The old ones come apart, all you have is straight pieces.
I did re-buff a brass bed once that someone tried to buff assembled. What a mess! Hornfixer, you're starting to give me nightmares again. Buffing and lacquering lamps,car parts and beds, I could never figure out which mouthpiece to use to play test them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I love air brushing, but never end up doing it becuase it takes to long to get set up for a small job.

Decided whilst building this paint booth to create a mini booth within it, permanently setup for airbrush work, hopefully it doesnt end up causing extra dust or getting in the way

A booth within a booth
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top