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Discussion Starter #1
So I am understanding that Pads can be too squishy like they sometimes are on a Bundy or too hard like they sometimes are on a Yamaha 23

If I am not mistaken, hard but not too hard pads such as the Precision pads offered by Music medic help create fast action.

They required a level tone hole.

On the question of pads and toneholes I have a question; If I level a tone hole, is it not better that I change the corresponding pad for in all liklihood the old pad, creased as it has been by the old tonehole, will not seal tight over the now level tonehole.

I return to a question I had in one of my first threads; namely it is possible to improve the quality of a Yamaha 21-23 over how it was after leaving the factory and its pre-delivery inspection by doing special tender things such as leveling the tone holes and replacing the corresponding pads?

Presumably the low b flat would play a little more pianissimo and enchanting and also over more time before the instrument begins to go out of regulation.

Said differently the question is, can the saxophone restorer claim in some cases that his student level restored horns are better in some respects than how there were when first purchased?

Each of the five non professional horns I over the past year restored had many uneven tone holes.

I can only presume they left the factory this way.
 

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".... help create fast action. "
So much is made of this so-called 'fast action'. The ideal is that the pad seals, right around the tone hole, with very little finger pressure that is additional to what is needed to overcome the spring. his can actually be achieved with both soft and hard pads. It so happens that the firmer the pads, the more perfect the environment has to be mechanically to achieve that.

The concept is that if the player spends extra time squeezing the keys tight, then that slows him down. However some outstanding players, who can play VERY fast, play on saxes that are appalling adjusted, such that the player needs quite high finger pressure. So we need to keep in touch with reality here.

"On the question of pads and toneholes I have a question; If I level a tone hole, is it not better that I change the corresponding pad for in all likelihood the old pad, creased as it has been by the old tonehole, will not seal tight over the now level tonehole."

If you alter a tone hole in any way, change the pad.

"I return to a question I had in one of my first threads; namely it is possible to improve the quality of a Yamaha 21-23 over how it was after leaving the factory and its pre-delivery inspection by doing special tender things such as levelling the tone holes and replacing the corresponding pads?"

As with almost ANY sax, yes. Never assume a factory adjustment is good. It seldom is. I would say that at least 2/3 of the work I do is correcting/improving what was done in the factory. After that, future servicing is minimal.

"Said differently the question is, can the saxophone restorer claim in some cases that his student level restored horns are better in some respects than how there were when first purchased?"

Even for routine work, yes, often! They are typically rather poor when purchased. They are way, way different from electronic gear, and Japanese cars, an Bic lighters, where we have come to expect almost if not perfection.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gordon, your reply is music to my ears in the sense that it validates the idea that an old- or new- horn that is worked on considerably probably plays better than when it left the factory.

Clearly this adds attractiveness to the idea of the restored horn assuming of course that the restorer has done his work well.

I can only assume the only instances of this not being the case would be old horns with badly woren mechanisms.
 

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zagzig said:
Gordon, your reply is music to my ears in the sense that it validates the idea that an old- or new- horn that is worked on considerably probably plays better than when it left the factory.

Clearly this adds attractiveness to the idea of the restored horn assuming of course that the restorer has done his work well.
This is no more a good assumption than the assumption that new saxophones will play well (unless they are Yanagisawas)
zagzig said:
I can only assume the only instances of this not being the case would be old horns with badly woren mechanisms.
Unless it has been through several cycles of wear and restoration, it is likely that a good tech can make it, too, play better than new...
 

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Unlike modern cars, vintage cars are likely to break axles easily, blow gaskets, blow out tyres, and drop oil.

IMO many vintage saxes have inferior, unevolved acoustic &/or mechanical design, which it is not really practical to ever fully correct.
 
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