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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
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People often ask about storing their instrument on a stand; I've always advised against it. The corks on a soprano clarinet can become compressed, a sax may pick up dust, instruments can get knocked over by pets or through carelessness — in general my feeling is that instruments are better off stored in their case. But I feel differently about my bass clarinet. It takes time to assemble and disassemble and I'm always a bit fearful of twisting the joints and bending the long rods or nudging a key out of alignment.

I've found that these scoped rifle cases work very nicely as padded slipcovers. The whole instrument will fit in the silicon-treated case although I always remove the neck and mouthpiece for swabbing and store them in the hard case. When concert band season ends the whole bass clarinet will go back in the hard case but while I'm practicing daily it's very handy to have the instrument pretty much assembled; I put the mouthpiece on the neck, attach a reed, stick the tenon in the socket and I'm ready to go. There's only one corked joint on the body of the instrument and it seals with an O-ring so I'm not worried about it becoming compressed. The soft lining is treated with a rust inhibitor which is a nice feature as well. I don't recommend storing the instrument outdoors however! :)
 

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I like your garden photo! I have the same BsCl stand that you do, and it works well.
My wife is an oboist, and she occasionally uses a cover like this for her English Horn when she's rehearsing/performing in a cold room, as a wood oboe/EH will crack in a heartbeat.
I try to avoid using my stand, unless I'm playing music with fast instrument changes. We play mostly in community and pit orchestras, where the venues can be cramped and our colleagues aren't necessarily as careful around others' equipment as they should be. If there's floor space and sufficient time for changes, I'm more likely to lay the instrument down on its case. For practice, I'm disassembling the bass completely for swabbing anyway, so it's just as easy to pack it away, and I want to avoid cork compression/joint lockup.
This is a good, inexpensive idea that works well for you. Thanks for sharing.
 
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