Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
Ive got a 1924 Conn New Wonder stencil with no pads in it (the old ones kind of disintegrated). I contacted Musicmedic to see if he had a set but I need to specify sizes, I have NO idea what sizes I could need and I dont want to take this thing apart. Should I just take it to a repair tech? Or does anyone know what sizes these horns used? Again, its a Conn New Wonder Alto stencil.
Thanks!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
Joined
·
3,764 Posts
If you don't want to take the horn apart, can we assume that you're not going to do the re-pad yourself?

If that's the case, take it to a tech and make it his/her concern. They know how to measure the pad cups and which thickness pads to use and where to get them etc.

That's why they're pros and the rest of us are just hacks.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
You should be able to measure the pad cup sizes without removing them. Get the published pad sizes of some comparable models. Then measure each cup up and down, and side to side. Compare your measurements to the published sizes. You will probably see some correlation. Re-measure the ones that don't correlate to make sure you are measuring correctly. Once you are sure of your measurements, you are ready to order. Also I sometimes order a few extra pads in slightly differing sizes for any cups I can't measure well on the horn. That way I'm covered.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Cerot said:
Hello all,
Ive got a 1924 Conn New Wonder stencil with no pads in it (the old ones kind of disintegrated). I contacted Musicmedic to see if he had a set but I need to specify sizes, I have NO idea what sizes I could need and I dont want to take this thing apart. Should I just take it to a repair tech? Or does anyone know what sizes these horns used? Again, its a Conn New Wonder Alto stencil.
Thanks!
There was no absolute standard in size of cups. There can be variance from one year to the next. For sax pads you'll need to measure the space on the *inside* (not outside) of the cup and order accordingly. Musicmedic has instructions in his help section on making measurements.

Also, I have to ask: do you plan on persuing repair as a hobby or as a one-off to try to save money on this one particular case? If it's the former, welcome, you can get a lot of help here. If it's the latter, I would recommend against it. You'll likely be dissapointed in the results and it'll end up costing you even more to undo any mistakes you make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have an interest in learning how to do repairs, but im not sure I want this one to be my practice one. I suppose ill end up taking it to a tech for this, but I have only one local tech and I dont know what his prices are (out of town).
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
Joined
·
3,764 Posts
Cerot said:
I have an interest in learning how to do repairs, but im not sure I want this one to be my practice one. I suppose ill end up taking it to a tech for this, but I have only one local tech and I dont know what his prices are (out of town).
Take the horn in to him and be clear and detailed as to what you want done. Put it in writing. Your local tech may well find other things on the horn that either need to be put right, or should be attended to, etc. Ask for a firm quote. You may not get it, but ask anyway. :)

Ask the tech to call you before proceeding with any work outside of what you asked for.

You might want to take some very detailed pics of your horn before you put it in for a repad/overhaul.

Finally, educate yourself as far as possible with regard to your particular horn and also find out what the going rate is for the work you asked to be done.

If the above sounds cautionary, it is meant to. Don't fall for the $600 quote that turns into $1500 once the tech has stripped the horn and "noticed a few things."

There are some great techs out there. There are also some disciples of P.T. Barnum as well. Until you're sure which type you are dealing with, be cautious.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Ill take it to the tech first (hes a very nice guy, he told me to bring the horn in right away when I got it, he has a genuine interest in old saxes, I think the only kind he gets to see here are the Bundy II's the schools use). But ill be wanting to do most of the work myself. Shellac seems to be the way to go, does anyone know if the musicmedic kit has enough shellac to do a full repad?
Also, the key cups on this horn are silver plated, will heat seriously mar them?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
Joined
·
3,764 Posts
I don't believe the musicmedic kit will have enough shellac for a full repad. Curt and Rich do supply shellac sticks at very reasonable prices. If you're gonna go the full repad route, and you're still at the "get a musicmedic kit" stage, I'm a little confused.

I don't see how you can do "most of the work" when it comes to a full repad.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
Translating Dogpants' post..... I wonder why technicians have tens of thousands of dollars worth of gear.

I have just written a post in another thread, which highlights some possible complications of getting just a single pad to close right.
http://www.saxontheweb.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=565664#post565664
New saxes normally have many of this type of problem to deal with. An old sax will most likely have scores of problems to deal with, other than the pads themselves.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top