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I am an advanced high school music student and was interested in the Cannonball brand until I heard about the P. Mauriat. I own a Selmer AS-500 and a TS-500. I have also played on a few other Yamaha models. I am interested in taking my next saxophone into college and hopefully beyond. I was wondering if a P. Mauriat model would be a good idea for a 16 year-old Junior in high school. any advice?
 

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The P Mauriat is a very safe and quality option for a great price. I have a 66RUL tenor and it's a great, smooth, free-blowing, powerful horn.
 

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Alright. Thank you much. I don't have much of a chance to experience other makes of saxophone because I go to school in a small town and have a music store that is much smaller. Therefore, all of our saxophone players own student model yamahas...
 

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I own a system-76 tenor and it works great! I was in the same position as you earlier this year, as I am going to start college next year. I have yet to regret my choice.
 

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I recommend them as they are easy to play in tune, easy blowing and affordable. They are great sounding professional saxophones. But...look into other taiwanese Saxophones tio. Cadeson 902 are very much like pm 66r but with other metal and better placed Palm keys.
 

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The P. Mauriat Le Bravo 200 tenors and altos are very nice saxophones, easy to play, free blowing and with accurate intonation. Palm keys are well placed and they are have a beautiful brushed gold laquer bell and body with a nickel silver neck that is beautifully engraved. I wish these were around when I was a student! Good Luck!
 

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P. Mauriat has some great saxophones, but if I were you I wouldn't discount the Cannonballs without giving them a try as well. Dr. Ray Smith at BYU plays Cannonball saxes and recommends them to his students who are both classical and jazz players. Either brand would be a great choice for a college level saxophone.
 

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I heard that the Cannonball brand usually has a brighter sound unique to jazz but is harder to play and blend into a concert ensemble where blending with the F Horn section is key..
 

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How far is Sebring from Lauderdale or Naples/Ft. Myers? It may be worth driving 2 hours to get to a bigger music store so you can try out some horns. Call Sam Ash and see what they have in stock... I'm in Tampa Bay and the ones up here sell both Mauriat AND Cannonball so you may be able to try both (along with other makes and models).
 

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I heard that the Cannonball brand usually has a brighter sound unique to jazz but is harder to play and blend into a concert ensemble where blending with the F Horn section is key..
Go to this link Branford Marsalis and listen to Escapades II - Reflections to hear a Cannonball being played in a classical style. Branford recorded this on a Stone Series model alto, and I understand that he now plays a Vintage model. It is more about the mouthpiece and tonal concept---not the make and model saxophone one plays on that influences the sound.
 

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If you can find a good deal on a used one that you like then it might be a good idea. See what's available in your area and evaluate the individuals.

If I were buying brand new, I think I'd pass on a P Mauriat... they cost the same as Yamaha and Yanagisawa horns which can do anything/everything you'd ever want to do and they'd have better resale value too. Japanese engineering and manufacturing philosophy strikes the right balance for me.
 

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My two bits are quite different from hgiles, I was a Yamaha endorser and while I too think Yamaha (and Yanagisawa) makes excellent instruments, the P. Mauriat saxes (to me) offer a far wider 'palette' of color from which to draw upon. I don't think that Yamaha or Yanagisawa have any better resale value at this point whatsoever. I have continually made sound comparisons with my University students playing Yamahas and my P. Mauriats with their set-ups and each and every one of them has expressed their thoughts about the P. Mauriat saxes having greater 'complexity' of sound on offer.

Try them all, let us know what YOU think! Good luck with your decision and enjoy. thanks, DC
 

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I would say that if you can get a Mauriat at a good price you really can't go wrong. Seeing as you are in the same boat as many of my students- i.e. small town, small music store, not many options- I would recommend a used horn as they are cheaper, or finding a dealer that will let you try the horn. Ideally you would want to try as many as possible to help locate "the one" but it seems in your situation it isn't as viable an option.

If possible, I agree with what buddy lee posted, take the trip if you can... buying horns sight unseen is a gamble and being able to play test a number of different ones can alleviate some future headaches. Ultimately, find something that feels right to you, plays great and you love... then play the snot out of it...
 

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I have a 67RUL. Great instrument. All the positive accolades hold as true for me as they have for others. But there is something to consider. Mauriat makes a few different models and which one you ultimately choose could affect how well you integrate in a concert setting. Here's what I mean:

I sit beside an MK VI player. He bought his new and the horn sounds really nice. The other person beside me plays a black laq' series II.

Without any effort my horn can project over both Selmers. To the point our director can hear if I miss a note. Over the entire band. This is not a good thing. No matter how quietly I play that thing just resonates over the entire ensemble. In a different setting this might be a good thing, but when the goal is to blend, it isn't.

But Mauriat has wisely seen to it to make other horns within their lines. Horns with different diameter bores, etc. These models might be better suited to sectional work. So if it's a Mauriat you're interested in, consider what it is you're seeking not only out of the instrument's tonal palate, but also what it does in terms of other factors like projection.

I can't speak to the other brands and models because I've only sampled them. And not longer than twenty minutes to an example. Long enough to warm the horn enough to felel like I'm getting a real sense of its true tone.

I should also say that I came from a True Tone and a Conn, so that type of sound was already ingrained into what I thought sounded best. And coming from playing first chair or being the only alto sax in a concert, jazz group or rock band meant that projection wasn't a problem. I was it. But the community band I'm currently with has four altos. Playing pianissimo or pp all the time (for nearly three hours per group rehearsal) can get a little annoying. A smaller bore instrument would suit what I'm doing [now] much more effectively.

My next horn will have a more compact sound. I'm leaning toward a Yanagisawa A902.

You can always change horns. You may lose a little money in the process, but you can always change instruments if what you choose doesn't suit the setting in which you're involved. And if you're not dumb like I am, a used horn can get you exactly what you need for a lot less money and be as great as any new example.

Best to you,
Harv
 

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If you can find a good deal on a used one that you like then it might be a good idea. See what's available in your area and evaluate the individuals.

If I were buying brand new, I think I'd pass on a P Mauriat... they cost the same as Yamaha and Yanagisawa horns which can do anything/everything you'd ever want to do and they'd have better resale value too. Japanese engineering and manufacturing philosophy strikes the right balance for me.
+1 What he said.
 
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