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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
My understanding is if I play a low D, then I play another D an octave higher without the octave key and so on….Bb, C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C……That is my level at this moment. It seems that one note (let’s say C) can play c,d e f g a b but I have not attempted that as yet and doesn’t make sense too me
 

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"When any woodwind, string, or brass instrument creates a pitch, a harmonic series is present above every pitch."

see here: Lesson 8a - The Overtone Series

"The Structure of the Overtone Series
The overtone series is a series of intervals, or a harmonic series, above a given pitch. We call the lowest pitch the fundamental, and every tone above it is considered an overtone. In the example below, C2 is the fundamental, C3 is the first overtone, G3 is the second overtone, and so on.

You may also describe the tones of the overtone series by labeling each overtone as a partial. In this system, the fundamental is considered equal to all other tones, so it is labeled as the first partial. In the example below, C2 is the first partial, C3 is the second partial, G3 is the third partial, and so on.

For the example below, determine the numbering for each of these notes as both overtones and partials. Then practice transposing the entire series to other pitches."

[The example referenced can be found in the link above]

Here is another useful link re overtone series. Overtone Series
 

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OP, what are your thoughts on all the answers trying to help with your question? Is it more clear now?

About 2/3 of this thread are people legitimately trying to help, yet the only comments you address are the silly off-topic ones.
Are you taking a survey, let the person reply to what he want too. Some of the members are rude and have they head high in the clouds thinking they are to good to answer or assist respectfully
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
"When any woodwind, string, or brass instrument creates a pitch, a harmonic series is present above every pitch."

see here: Lesson 8a - The Overtone Series
"When any woodwind, string, or brass instrument creates a pitch, a harmonic series is present above every pitch."

see here: Lesson 8a - The Overtone Series

"The Structure of the Overtone Series
The overtone series is a series of intervals, or a harmonic series, above a given pitch. We call the lowest pitch the fundamental, and every tone above it is considered an overtone. In the example below, C2 is the fundamental, C3 is the first overtone, G3 is the second overtone, and so on.

You may also describe the tones of the overtone series by labeling each overtone as a partial. In this system, the fundamental is considered equal to all other tones, so it is labeled as the first partial. In the example below, C2 is the first partial, C3 is the second partial, G3 is the third partial, and so on.

For the example below, determine the numbering for each of these notes as both overtones and partials. Then practice transposing the entire series to other pitches."

[The example referenced can be found in the link above]

Here is another useful link re overtone series. Overtone Series

"The Structure of the Overtone Series
The overtone series is a series of intervals, or a harmonic series, above a given pitch. We call the lowest pitch the fundamental, and every tone above it is considered an overtone. In the example below, C2 is the fundamental, C3 is the first overtone, G3 is the second overtone, and so on.

You may also describe the tones of the overtone series by labeling each overtone as a partial. In this system, the fundamental is considered equal to all other tones, so it is labeled as the first partial. In the example below, C2 is the first partial, C3 is the second partial, G3 is the third partial, and so on.

For the example below, determine the numbering for each of these notes as both overtones and partials. Then practice transposing the entire series to other pitches."
I will study the overtone series then I’ll should have a better understanding. Thanks
 

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...It seems that one note (let’s say C) can play c,d e f g a b but I have not attempted that as yet and doesn’t make sense too me
Here is another way of looking at this. Overtones are harmonics of the fundamental note. These are integer multipliers of the fundamental frequency: 2x, 3x, 4x, 5x, 6x and so on.

Take this table with frequencies of each note on a keyboard. If your fundamental is C3 = 261.63Hz, your first overtone is 2x C3 = 523.26Hz, which is the exact octave C4 in the table. the next overtone is 3x C3 = 784.89Hz and that's close to G4. Next is 4x C3 = 1,046.52Hz which is C5. Next it 5x C3 = 1,308.15Hz which is close to E5 and so forth. So your overtones sequence is: C3, C4, G4, C5, E5 etc. That's how you play different notes the higher you go. They are not in sequence c,d e f g a b as you spelled. They follow the harmonics frequencies, skipping notes, jumping through octaves, but getting closer to each other the higher you go. As said above most are not exact, except for the "perfect" intervals.

Azure Font Aqua Symmetry Pattern
 

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My apologies for coming off as flippant or rude…not at all my intent, just a product of direct language versus beating around the bush.
It’s great that you’re thinking about overtones and tone development in general as a beginner, as most just start with a method book and maybe some lessons like in school. It’s just a pretty broad topic with a lot of potential for pitfalls, backslides, and terrible habit-learning that can make you think you’re much further ahead in the game than you really are. It’s super easy to tighten up and goose out any overtone or altissimo note and even seem like you’re killing it when you could be setting yourself up for a ton of frustration if/ when you understand why and how you’ve approached it all wrong and now you’re on a plateau where you have to climb down and walk the valley floor a while until you can start climbing again.

Do you have a set or two of basic overtone exercises? I’d seriously recommend forgetting about everything except the low Bb, B, C, and C# fundamentals/ fingerings and start out just getting the first two partials (the octave above, then the fifth above that). Think of the fundamental as 1 then the first two partials/ harmonics as 2 and 3. These are some basic exercises used by, among others, Joe Allard. Refer to what jaysz said in post #6 and work:

2:1 and 1:2
3:1 and 1:3
3:2 and 2:3
3:2:1 and 1:2:3

The other important factor is matching the harmonics with the regular fingered pitches…notice when you play the middle C using the low C fingering how nice and full the sound is? Notice that it’s also sharp…(low Bb vs mid Bb will be more sharp). Now work on making your regular mid C fingering sound that big and full using just the standard LH 2 fingering, but also making the pitch of the overtone line up with the standard fingering. After doing these exercise correctly for a little bit I guarantee you’ll be moving your mouthpiece on the cork a bit, as you’ll find the tonal center of your set up.

Doing things like this is like weight lifting for your tone and sound quality. make it fun…it’s worth it. When I don’t have time or will to practice anything else or have no time to warm up for a gig or rehearsal, overtone scales are what I do. It connects me to the instrument instantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
My apologies for coming off as flippant or rude…not at all my intent, just a product of direct language versus beating around the bush.
It’s great that you’re thinking about overtones and tone development in general as a beginner, as most just start with a method book and maybe some lessons like in school. It’s just a pretty broad topic with a lot of potential for pitfalls, backslides, and terrible habit-learning that can make you think you’re much further ahead in the game than you really are. It’s super easy to tighten up and goose out any overtone or altissimo note and even seem like you’re killing it when you could be setting yourself up for a ton of frustration if/ when you understand why and how you’ve approached it all wrong and now you’re on a plateau where you have to climb down and walk the valley floor a while until you can start climbing again.

Do you have a set or two of basic overtone exercises? I’d seriously recommend forgetting about everything except the low Bb, B, C, and C# fundamentals/ fingerings and start out just getting the first two partials (the octave above, then the fifth above that). Think of the fundamental as 1 then the first two partials/ harmonics as 2 and 3. These are some basic exercises used by, among others, Joe Allard. Refer to what jaysz said in post #6 and work:

2:1 and 1:2
3:1 and 1:3
3:2 and 2:3
3:2:1 and 1:2:3

The other important factor is matching the harmonics with the regular fingered pitches…notice when you play the middle C using the low C fingering how nice and full the sound is? Notice that it’s also sharp…(low Bb vs mid Bb will be more sharp). Now work on making your regular mid C fingering sound that big and full using just the standard LH 2 fingering, but also making the pitch of the overtone line up with the standard fingering. After doing these exercise correctly for a little bit I guarantee you’ll be moving your mouthpiece on the cork a bit, as you’ll find the tonal center of your set up.

Doing things like this is like weight lifting for your tone and sound quality. make it fun…it’s worth it. When I don’t have time or will to practice anything else or have no time to warm up for a gig or rehearsal, overtone scales are what I do. It connects me to the instrument instantly.
Ok, let do the overtones for dummies….With just playing the lower C Note…..what other notes can be played….Just the lower “C”
 

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Where’s C1
the number refers to the octave on a piano. C3 is middle C. C1 is two octaves below it.
it doesn't matter to the math. you just need to know how they compare relative to the starting note.
starting on any C, next two notes in the overtone sequence are an octave higher, the next two yet another octave higher etc.
 

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Ok, let do the overtones for dummies….With just playing the lower C Note…..what other notes can be played….Just the lower “C”
Well…Guto supplied a chart that gives a lot of specific information and the pitches can obviously be off a little, but basically from each of the lowest notes: Bb, B, and C you get the same intervals. The higher fingerings follow the same math but disregard the differences as those bottom three are the base of it all and the place to start. Here’s all three spelled up higher than we really need to think about. I also already gave you the C notes in response to the image you posted where someone forgot to add the bass and treble clefs so the picture would make sense (Post 8). The leaps are large and get smaller, but the note occurrence is always the next highest step up where the note is seen:

Bb, Bb, F, Bb, D, F, Ab, Bb, C, D, E, F, G, Ab, A, Bb
B, B, F#, B, D#, F#, A, B, C#, D#, E#, F#, G#, A, A#, B
C, C, G, C, E, G, Bb, C, D, E, F#, G, A, Bb, B, C
 

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Hear we go again. Why not just answer
He did. There are multiple correct answers to this question being shared multiple times…someone’s not reading the responses and understanding the information and it’s not just the OP, who is getting it; just slowly…this is a concept that would span several lessons and it’s being addressed on an internet forum where we can’t have personal contact and demonstrate ideas that are difficult to put into words.

because that exact question was just answered two posts above. what's the point of us spending time writing posts when the OP doesn't read them?
yes. There’s duplicate answer responses happening. The most confusing aspect here is the letter and number usage. While technically more correct in a music theory context to refer to the notes and the respective piano octaves…it’s beyond confusing for a beginner on saxophone to understand why you’re call a note C 4 that plays as an A on an alto sax or a D on a tenor. Use saxophone fingerings and note names when discussing saxophone technique…especially when global and not specific to Bb or Eb saxes at all.
 

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Ok, I’m getting low c then g mid c high c
I should be getting the E,G,Bb before the high C

C,G,C (E,G,Bb) then high C….is that correct
Finger Low C…Play that note.
Low C…play C one octave up (regular C no octave)
Low C…play the G above the previous C (G with the octave key)
Low C…play C two octaves up (high C with octave key)
Low C…play E a third above high C (palm key E)
The G above that tends to be pretty hard to nail and just getting up to the E and working on the sound is months to decades of work. Again, it’s like weight lifting…you can’t PR every week and sometimes you might not be able to hit much of anything. It teaches you to work for your tone/ timbre, pitch matching, how to play even the questionable reeds well enough to get your money’s worth, and that you can play on just about any horn, mouthpiece, or reed strength (within reason) as long as you have solid fundamentals and a loose embouchure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Finger Low C…Play that note.
Low C…play C one octave up (regular C no octave)
Low C…play the G above the previous C (G with the octave key)
Low C…play C two octaves up (high C with octave key)
Low C…play E a third above high C (palm key E)
The G above that tends to be pretty hard to nail and just getting up to the E and working on the sound is months to decades of work. Again, it’s like weight lifting…you can’t PR every week and sometimes you might not be able to hit much of anything. It teaches you to work for your tone/ timbre, pitch matching, how to play even the questionable reeds well enough to get your money’s worth, and that you can play on just about any horn, mouthpiece, or reed strength (within reason) as long as you have solid fundamentals and a loose embouchure.
Perfect, this is what I needed to see…..Grrrrrrrrreat…Thanks
 
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