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Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing a lot of reading on this forum and elsewhere in preparation for tearing apart my bari. Can someone take a look at the list of events that I have below and tell me if I have things in the appropriate order and if I am missing anything?

1) straighten body and remove all dents (involves disassembly of entire body)
2) strip lacquer while body is apart
3) level tone holes
4) reassemble body and solder broken key guards
5) refit keys and get things roughly adjusted (straighten posts, swedge, adjust keys, etc.)
6) polish, lacquer, or plate - I still haven't decided how I am going to finish it. I would like to relacquer but don't know if it is something that I am willing or able to tackle and I can't currently afford to have it professionally done. I have been reading the great thread that Ken K and tbone contributed to a couple years ago so we'll see how brave I get. Currently am considering just doing a bare brass hand polished finish.
7) install all new springs
8) repad, cork and felt and make final adjustments
9) PLAY!!

Only 9 steps...piece of cake! (Don't I wish!)

Thanks for the help.

Ethan

Edit: Randomly insert scratching head, cursing under breath, more research, and adult beverages as necessary...
 

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.....I am missing anything?

1) straighten body and remove all dents (involves disassembly of entire body)
2) strip lacquer while body is apart
3) level tone holes
4) reassemble body and solder broken key guards
5) refit keys and get things roughly adjusted (straighten posts, swedge, adjust keys, etc.)
6) polish, lacquer, or plate - I still haven't decided how I am going to finish it. I would like to relacquer but don't know if it is something that I am willing or able to tackle and I can't currently afford to have it professionally done. I have been reading the great thread that Ken K and tbone contributed to a couple years ago so we'll see how brave I get. Currently am considering just doing a bare brass hand polished finish.
7) install all new springs
8) repad, cork and felt and make final adjustments
9) PLAY!!.....
You're missing a lot but the answer is a book.... So, considering your steps:


1) straighten body and remove all dents (involves disassembly of entire body)
2) strip lacquer while body is apart
4) reassemble body and solder broken key guards (you can't level tone holes on an disassembled body. Tone holes like low D will not work out.)
7) install all new springs (installing springs can move posts, it 's best to do it before swedging)
5) refit keys and get things roughly adjusted (straighten posts, swedge, adjust keys, etc.) I'm not sure what that means but... If you move posts before you level tone holes the tone holes will no longer be level.
3) level tone holes
6) polish, lacquer, or plate - I still haven't decided how I am going to finish it. I would like to relacquer but don't know if it is something that I am willing or able to tackle and I can't currently afford to have it professionally done. I have been reading the great thread that Ken K and tbone contributed to a couple years ago so we'll see how brave I get. Currently am considering just doing a bare brass hand polished finish.
8) repad, cork and felt and make final adjustments
9) PLAY!!

Overhauling a Bari is a huge job. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You're missing a lot but the answer is a book.... So, considering your steps:


1) straighten body and remove all dents (involves disassembly of entire body)
2) strip lacquer while body is apart
4) reassemble body and solder broken key guards (you can't level tone holes on an disassembled body. Tone holes like low D will not work out.)
7) install all new springs (installing springs can move posts, it 's best to do it before swedging)
5) refit keys and get things roughly adjusted (straighten posts, swedge, adjust keys, etc.) I'm not sure what that means but... If you move posts before you level tone holes the tone holes will no longer be level.
3) level tone holes
6) polish, lacquer, or plate - I still haven't decided how I am going to finish it. I would like to relacquer but don't know if it is something that I am willing or able to tackle and I can't currently afford to have it professionally done. I have been reading the great thread that Ken K and tbone contributed to a couple years ago so we'll see how brave I get. Currently am considering just doing a bare brass hand polished finish.
8) repad, cork and felt and make final adjustments
9) PLAY!!

Overhauling a Bari is a huge job. Good luck!
Thanks Curt! I am slowly learning just how big a job this is going to be!!

The re-order makes sense. I thought of leveling the tone holes while it was disassembled to allow for easier access, but since that is not an option I may just have to get the drill file extension that you have for my tone hole files.

The rough refit of everything was meant to mean that, without glueing the pads on and putting all the cork and felt back on, I would adjust all the keys the best I could so that if I decided to re-lacquer there would be less adjusting, leading to possible damage to the new lacquer. If I don't re-lacquer than I would do whatever finish I decided to do before refitting the keys and would repad, recork, refelt and level tone holes as part of one massive process.

You mentioned that I am leaving out a books worth of steps... I realize that there are a lot of little things that I didn't include (like cleaning and leveling pad cups, cleaning the body before finishing, cleaning/straightening/lubricating rods, etc.). Partly because I didn't want a 300 step list, but mostly because I don't know what they all are! I am learning as I go here so I fully plan on having to go back and un-do/re-do many things as I go. Are there any big steps that I am missing?

Thanks again!

Ethan
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No, but now I want one!

Do you understand how big of an investment your tools could be for a job like this?
A lot!!! I have no delusions that I can afford all of the "proper" tools right now. I will do the best I can with what I have, purchase those few specialty and necessary tools as I find I need them, and continue to be creative and build tools for far less than they normally cost. There are times when there is no substitute for the right tool; and there are times when creativity, patience, and a lot of hours can be a pretty good substitute.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What is wrong with the old springs?
Some were broken or missing and most of the rest were pretty rusted and pitted. I figured that since I was going to have to do so much work on it anyway, I might as well replace the springs too.

This was one of the first lessons that I learned... keep, or at least measure, the old spring so you know what size and strength to replace it with! Oh well, I'm pretty good at trial and error! (especially the error part...)
 

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HAHA! Sorry, forgot to mention that I already took out all the springs, pads, felt, cork, etc. (at least what was left of it).
Before I take any cork, felt or pad off, I take a look at it and decide how it functions, and whether its replacement needs to be much the same or thicker or thinner. If I'm doing a whole sax, I record details for the corks/felts. It saves a heck of a lot of guess-perimenting later.
 

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Before I take any cork, felt or pad off, I take a look at it and decide how it functions, and whether its replacement needs to be much the same or thicker or thinner. If I'm doing a whole sax, I record details for the corks/felts. It saves a heck of a lot of guess-perimenting later.
Good advice Gordon, I did not do this but I had the distinct advantage of having another horn (in playing order and regulated) to use as a reference for the thicknesses of all my corks. It helped a lot with getting the keywork back on correctly as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That is good advice! When I got it alot of the cork and felt was missing or damaged. I probably should have taken the time to take some notes but I was too excited to start working (actually started working on it in a hotel room, with my leatherman...)!\

I'll post some photos tonight.
 

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Good luck Ethan, you have a bigger restoration project than I did!
 
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