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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to get a Martin C-melody Home Model repadded and want some advice. The neck has a definate oval shape through the cuve and then becomes perfectly circular at the cork end. Eric Beach is a top tech in the DC area who loves vintage horns and has restored a couple horns for me. He says horns that were dropped on their head have this slightly squashed neck. This seems plausible and he has seen plenty of old horns. But, the one other 'Home' model owner I spoke to (in the UK) says his sax has an 'ovalized' neck as well. Before Eric beats this out, I thought I would put a shout out to anyone who may have a Home Model. Any chance this is part of the design? I've looked at pictures on The Martin Story site (great resource) but cannot tell from the pictures.
 

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I had a Martin C for a while. Neck was NOT oval. Played very nicely. Sold it here to a member who is very happy with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Homely Model Martin.

Yes, Cybersax does have some good information on this 'ugly duckling' and some lovely pictures of a Home Model. Last time I contacted Bear, he seemed..how should i say....'grumpy'.
I have no idea how it will play, but I do appreciate the minimalist simplicity. A lot less pads to leak and the repad is a bargain.
 

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I was just looking at themartinstory.net and this question came screaming at me when I saw the photos of the home model. Is the home model only keyed to C1 and are they all like that? I've never seen that before.
 

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Just called the only guy I know with one of those, his neck is not oval
 

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eddierich said:
I was just looking at themartinstory.net and this question came screaming at me when I saw the photos of the home model. Is the home model only keyed to C1 and are they all like that? I've never seen that before.
They were an even more dumbed down version of the C-Melody for home use and yeah, only keyed from C1 to C3. Buescher had a version as well called the Academy.

About Bear being grumpy... I found him to be most helpful when I first came across the online saxophone resources. There are certain things he takes offense too though, and has no problem expressing; such as modifying vintage horns.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oval neck - Beat it! Just beat it!

Thanks Martin Williams for making that call to your friend with the Home Model. That's just the info I needed.

Bruce, you're right. This is a curved neck with no brace. The other Martin C-mel necks have a cross brace. This neck does have a slight downward bend that is not reflected in some of the pics on The Martin Story site. Horn dropped on head. End of story. The tech here says it does say something about the quality of the metal used that it 'squashed' in such a uniform way. He'll put in the little metal balls and tap it back into round shape.

Another note - this horn does not have a bow brace either. It's incredibly light. I should weigh it and compare it to my Conn (the one with all those superfluous keys and notes).

MM
 

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These were a basic horn at best. I think many of the Bueschers (academy) were actually painted rather than lacquered. No extra keys or bracing. Your horn may not have been dropped. If the player put the neck on holding it at the cork end, it could just have been a bad idea. Bassoon bocals are easy to bend this way. I have fixed a few bent down necks by putting the neck on the horn and bending up using the body to hold the bottom tenon. They usually pop back but the finish may suffer.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Saxophone CSI

I'm sure your right (again) Bruce. There is no sign of impact on the top of the neck (this is starting to sound like an episode of 'Sax CSI') so it could be a simple bend down. I'll make sure tech tries your simple push up adjustment before bringing out the hammer and metal balls. He was afraid this neck repair would be as much efort as the repad and he knew it would leave marks on the neck. If it pops out , I may save a few beans.
Thanks again to everyone!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
C-melody Weigh-in

Update on my Martin Home Model. Eric Beach at Washington Music Center (aka 'Chuck Levin's' or "chuck's') did a super job on the restoration and repad. The squashed oval neck came out beautifully, no sign of being bent back and tapped out. This guy LOVES vintage horns and is a great resource in the DC area.

My Home model is only 80% a saxophone (2 octaves only) but it is a LOT of fun. It has some real quirks (to put it lightly). I don't like the fact it does not have a cage on the Eb tone hole. I've had to swing horn away or to the side of my body as I was pinning it shut at first. Then I caught my T-shirt in it so it wouldn't seal. Yes Grumps..it is a little limited.

I lcan't get over how light it is. I had an offical weigh in on a postage meter scale. My Conn Straight neck Cmel is 5.65 lbs. The Martin Home Model weighs in at only 3.75 lbs. Without the neck and bow brace, it feels a little fragile compared to the Tank of a Conn - but it has a voice all its own! Gorgeous tone and no troublesome 'lower' notes to motorboat.

MM
 

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Mark - glad it's a happy ending, but don't you miss the low C# (which isn't there....) ?

I occasionally dust mine off and get it out (especially to confuse other sax players...), and can almost live with the lack of extra mechanism, but to manufacture a horn going from low-D to bell-C, with nothing in between ? :?
 
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