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Sat down to practice the last few days and feeling like i am sounding very 'honky', out of nowhere.
It is very noticable.
Am I being lazy with something?

Is this a symptom of something?
I am at a loss.
 

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Sat down to practice the last few days and feeling like i am sounding very 'honky', out of nowhere.
It is very noticable.
Am I being lazy with something?

Is this a symptom of something?
I am at a loss.
Any changes in gear? How long has it been since you last had regular (frequent, diligent) practice?

My first guess would be embouchure and perhaps how much mouthpiece you take in.
 

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Sat down to practice the last few days and feeling like i am sounding very 'honky', out of nowhere.
It is very noticable.
Am I being lazy with something?

Is this a symptom of something?
I am at a loss.
Honkers from Yonkers.................different reeds? softer reeds? sitting on a bulb horn? is your lig doing it's job?
 

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Hard to advise without more info, but my first question would be: did you try a different reed? Reeds can die, out of the blue, for no apparent reason. Or they can suddenly become unplayable if the weather/humidity changes suddenly. But you probably know that.

My second question would be: are you returning to playing after a long-ish break? Sometimes if I'm returning from a vacation or otherwise have been unable play for a week or more, it takes a while to get my tone back.

If you've tried different reeds, and you're not coming off a break, and you haven't changed mouthpieces or made any other significant change, then it's time to look at equipment. Maybe your octave key isn't saddled well, and it's not fitting well over the vent? That can cause a lot of weirdness.
 

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A honking 'Out Of Nowhere'? I would love to hear that! Soundclip?
 

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Have you recently switched to playing "Flying Goose" reeds? That may be your problem. :) Seriously, a great way to diagnose whether it is the "tone producer" or the saxophone itself is to play on the mouthpiece and neck apart from the saxophone. If you can produce a clear, well controlled tone on the "tone producer", it means the issue is with the saxophone itself. If that is the case if you have a leak light, that would be a good place to start. If the problem still exists playing the mouthpiece and neck, it is difficult to give any advice without knowing your "set-up" and how long you have been playing. Good luck. Let us know if you find a solution.
 

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Sounds like your side Bb, C, or high F key might be getting stuck. Add a bit of oil, work it in by moving the key, and see if honks fly south for the winter.
 

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Are you about 9mo to a year into playing? If so, I think it is a phase. Because I went through it. Is the "honk" you describe mostly an escape into an unintended octave?
Can't explain it. Perhaps one is acquiring enough control to approach a desired tone concept, but occasionally misfiring wildly.
Think about adding topspin to a tennis stroke, there is a chance it will go over the fence until you really have it nailed down but the result is so much better than a flat hit.
I was lucky that I had a great and patient teacher who worked with me on measures to tame the wild tones.
They are now banished and I think my sound is coming along pretty well. Rare squeaks, though! Not as sabotaging as a honk, but current focus of effort.
If you are an adult learner, you have the advantage of knowing and applying your best learning strategies and understanding your motivation--you can be intensely intentional. But you lose out on the easy intuition of the plastic child...
Oh, I should tell you the fix! If you clearly pre-auralize (pre-hear in your mind's ear) the desired pitch just before you play it, it will be produced properly. I'm not a bad reader, and if I'm just lazily following the dots with my fingerings a honk may sneak in--D2 the worst culprit for me. If I concentrate on hearing it just before I play it, it is perfect. I believe in general this is good advice for a woodwind--clearly hear the melody in your head as you are playing it. You already do this in order play overtones and altissimo, but making it a constant habit has helped me a lot.
 
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