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Selmer MarkVII Tenor
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Hi all :
I have been reading different post trying to understand the differences between mouthpieces and I found, according to Theo Wanne that : "The mouthpiece, not the saxophone, is responsible for over 80% of the tone a musician gets while playing. And half of the sound that comes from the mouthpiece comes from the baffle." ( to read the whole article , open :http://www.theowanne.com/mouthpieces101/baffle.php
then... Otto Links are "Large Chamber· mouthpieces that "allows the air stream to spread producing a fat & warm sound. " ( to read thw whole article open http://www.theowanne.com/mouthpieces101/chamber.php)
also the opening between the reed and mouthpiece known as the "tip opening" and expressed by each manufacturar with a code ( numeric , or letter).
According to cybersax: ". Take care not to confuse the implications of tip opening and overall chamber configuration. Tip opening -- the most commonly disclosed element of a mouthpiece's facing -- has little to do with the sound a mouthpiece produces. Sound determination is governed by chamber characteristics (the elements of which are chamber size & shape, baffle design & height, throat size & shape). Facing (the elements of which are facing length, curve profile & ultimate tip opening) affects your response characteristics, plus has volume & projection potential implications. As an example of these totally separate functions, think of the volume and treble/bass knobs on your stereo. You can't change the nature of your stereo's sound by twisting the volume knob, and no matter how loud you make the music the sound characteristics really don't change." ( full article :http://www.cybersax.com/QA/Q&A_MouthpieceBasics.html)
So, when I choose an Otto link Super Tone Master 5* I am picking a Large Chamber, a roll-over baffle that "A unique quality of the roll-over baffle is that while the sound initially seems brighter the general sound shaped by the rest of the mouthpiece interior is maintained. For example,in an Otto Link you can have a high roll over baffle to get a lot of edge and yet still get the fat spread sound that the large chamber and concave inner side walls produce"..
My question is: the difference between an Otto link Super Tone MASTER 5*(0.085" tip opening) and an Otto link Super Tone MASTER 9 (0.120" tip opening) is in the VOLUME it sounds , but it mantains the same baffle design and the same chamber size giving the same tone ( warmth tone) typical of these models... or are there differences in design of the baffle and chamber size because of the different tip opening ? Many thanks...
 

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The tip opening affects more than just volume. I have played .120 that could only get so loud and I have played .100 that could knock a wall down. It has to do with the tip opening in relation to the baffle height and chamber size and shape. For me a bigger tip and a louder bigger sound but many times it sounds really spread and sometimes hollow if the baffle isn't at the right height. Also, if the baffle is higher it makes a big tip opening not seem so big. I played for 6 hours today on a EB link with the highest baffle I have ever seen. The tip is at .115 which is bigger than I usually am comfortable on but this blows like a .105 for me because of that high baffle.

A far as maintaining the same baffle and chamber from a 5* to a 9 I think the Babbitt company can't even maintain the same baffle between two mouthpieces of the same tip. If you have ever gone to a music store and tried multiple links of the the same tip.......they are all over the place. You will notice huge differences from mouthpiece to mouthpiece.
 

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...yep..... being theoretical about mouthpieces,and actually trying them are 2 other things... I was fortunate that I made the brave (and intelligent) move at the start to buy a box of 18 mouthpieces...I had 8 vintage link stm's and they ALL played different...that's right,they were mostly the same size.,but played different

you have an advantage of getting a link stm copy from a custom-mouthpiece maker like sakshama(or any of our other esteemed gurus here),because if you are looking for something in your playing after buying a custom mouthpiece he will adjust it for you
 

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Hi all :
"The mouthpiece, not the saxophone, is responsible for over 80% of the tone a musician gets while playing."
I do wish folks would stop bandying this quote about so much......while it may seem quite 'definitive'...it is so laden with misunderstanding it's seriously shocking....

This is not a criticism of you, Hum...you just went to research and this is what you found....but to say the least, it's a tad of an overstatement....

As Nef says, tip opening effects a lotta things.
It effects which overtones get boosted and which overtones get subdued....darkness/brightness.
It effects the "focus" or the "spread"....narrowness/wideness.
It can effect articulation and punch.... reediness and edginess.

As suggested, go try a bunch of mouthpieces. Go to any store, take the same mfr. and the same model, and just try a bunch of different openings.....and don't try them in sequence necessarily...because the differences are more dramatized if you skip a few sizes (i.e. jump from a 4c to a 6c, a 5* to an 8*, etc...)
 
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