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All the other pieces I see available have been refaced. Granted, this is a small tip opening, but the long face really makes it project. I guess some could look at this small tip opening and judge it to be unplayable as it sits. But, once you touch it, you can never go back. As such, un-retouched pieces can be seen as more desirable, but generally only when it is originally open to the tip opening you want. So would this piece be more desirable if I have it opened up, or original? As far as I can figure this is an un-retouched early New York Reso Chamber.
As soon as you deface it, you reject the prospective buyer pool that seeks the collectible. Once at a new tip opening, what is the chance that you select the “correct” size? What is the “correct“ facing curvature? Who is the best to do the job?

Put it up for auction and let the buyer decide whether to deface and how much to pay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
That is what I am thinking, although I am partial to this thing. I am thinking I might put it up high an accept offers. If I can't put a big dent in that guitar price tag, I will probably just keep it. I have had some slants, play a stubby and a florida STM, and this piece really stands apart. Thanks for the input guys.
 

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I've owned a number of Reso Tenors over the years, still have one or two I'll probably never part with. In the more open facings they are great. One of mine Eddie Daniels wanted to buy some years ago when he came to Emory University. Broke my heart not to sell it to him - but it was my main piece at the time! There'a a vid of me playing "How Deep is the Ocean" somewhere on the web on that piece and my former 103k MkVI. A glorious sound, if you like traditional tenor sounds. I've since gone to more open facings and a different tonal concept.
I agree with the poster who suggests leaving it original and letting the buyer decide to clean it up if he wants. The only community pickier than Jazzers about their equip, is Classical-ers! LOL. And they'll want that original facing. There was an entire pedagogy built around it! Just like you wouldn't reface a Rascher.
 

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S: SA II. A+T: Martin HC1 T: Mark VI A:39 King Zephyr B: Martin HC imperial
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A JA facing was considered “open” for the time. The JA facing is rare to start with and has collectible value.

i would NEVER reface a Hawkin Special HS, JA facing or any of the other special facings on the vintage NY Link mouthpieces. If you want to refacea vintage NY Link find a 2 or 3 or 4. Leave the 5+ facings alone!
 

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The Otto Link J.A. got a reputation as being really open, but I'm not sure that is true based on my experience. In old Link advertisements, the J.A. is listed at the bottom of the chart, below the Hawkins Special (which was a #6). The J.A. facing could just as likely be a different curvature (short, long, asymmetric, etc.) and not be the largest simply because it is at the bottom of the advertising list. A J.A. facing could be a 5.547 facing, using the old Link designation (which changed over time). No way to tell after 70 years.

Looking at the above pictures, what about that facing would make anybody believe that it is still original as it left the work bench? I'm not saying that it's bad, in that it plays bad, I'm just saying that is not possible for any regularly played ebonite mouthpiece to remain unchanged for 70 years. Just the exposure to air and light over the years makes certain that the facing isn't original (as shown in this blog at picture #9 and surrounding comment).

A longer facing can allow the reed to flex more right at the table and feel like a smaller tip (because, in effect, you are playing a smaller tip). But not necessarily. It also depends on the remainder of the facing curve towards the tip. By making that part of the lay "steeper" than normal, a long lay can still have the feel of a larger tip opening requiring l’embouchure de l’acier.

Probably all of us put sufficient force on the reed such that the actual full length of the facing isn't really ever in play. Any slight pressure on the reed will effectively shorten the lay, unless you have the mouthpiece so far in your mouth that you are only touching the reed beyond the "take off" point, i.e., only where the reed is still flat on the table. That would require that you place a tenor mp in your mouth about an inch and a half beyond your lips/teeth. Most of us probably couldn't control our gag reflex at that point, let alone control the reed.

If the lay is long with a gradual curve, the pressure of lips/teeth will effectively narrows the tip. But if the long lay has an increased curvature towards the tip, the long lay doesn't have the same perceived effect.

If the OP takes the mp to have a refacer look at it, have them map the curvature. That could be what you like about the piece and really be the value (to you the player). The value to others?
 

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I think it's worth mentioning that the scars on the beak might be a factor for people. This is one, that I would want to play before shelling out a premium, because collectors are probably not going to want it.
 
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