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Discussion Starter #1
I just found an old Otto Link MASTER Link (with the cut in rails). Appears to be one of the oldest models double band reads OTTO LINK & CO NEW YORK, also engraved along table SERIES C 14, FACING NO. 3

1. It looks like the old heat-miser was using it as the bite plate is melted. Is there a recommended way to remove the old bite plate and replace?

2. Finish is back to bare brass is it generally approved to have the finish redone?

3. Is there any one the specializes in restoring these older Links?

Any additional info, history or value estimate would be appreciated.

PS it came with a free 1905 Pan American Tenor (P105XX) in Gold Lacquer and Case
 

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Sure you can have the plating redone. To replace the biteplate you heat it out and replace with a piece of ebonite cut to size. This is one of the first Otto Link pieces, from the early 1930's. Not sure about value, look at finished items on ebay, these aren't the most desirable Links. Also not sure whether restoration will help or hurt the value. Recommendations -- where are you? I do this sort of thing in the UK, Matt Marantz is in New York and also does them. I'm sure there are others.
 

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I usually chip out the old bite plate with the small blade of a pocket knife. I make new bite plates out of sheet or cast acrylic. In general, restored ones are not replated. But some are. Replated I think they sell easier but I’m not sure they recover the price of replating plus restoration. I think a replated restored one went for $230 on eBay recently.
 

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You can of course let the mouthpiece be restored, but it will cost money and change the character of this original unmodified piece. Not many of those original pieces exist, most have been modified, refaced and sometimes destroyed. Normally refacing a fully original piece doesn't make it more valuable.

From a collection/collector point or if you want to sell it I would I would only replace the biteplate and leave the facing and finish as is (maybe a mild cleaning could help).

If you want to play it you can do what ever you want with it, but also remember that you destroy an original piece by doing that and that's it's unsure if you will like the result. A 3 tip opening is very small to play and opening up the piece will make it better, but you can't go too far with that. It will also destroy the original sound those pieces had (on the mellow/dark side, opening it up will make it often brighter).

Here is some information about Otto Link on the site of Theo Wanne:
https://theowanne.com/knowledge/mouthpiece-museum/otto-link-mouthpieces/

Here are some pictures of old 1930's Otto Link's from my collection (all worked on before I got them):

- 1930'-35's Master Link - refaced from 4 to 6 - original plating (unknown refacer, could be 1940's Otto Link):
https://plus.google.com/photos/108637650008771977212/albums/5944955459665153793

- 1930-35's Master Link - refaced from 5 to 9 - silver plated (work done by Mark Spencer in Australia):
https://plus.google.com/photos/108637650008771977212/albums/6346445786877459745

- 1935-40's Four**** - refaced from 5* to 10* - gold plated (work done by Freddy Gregory):
https://plus.google.com/photos/108637650008771977212/albums/5944954169385381137
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses, I cleaned out the bit plate residual with a utility blade it came out pretty easily and tidied up the MP with some chrome polish just to take off the corrosion.

I glued (contact cement) in some 1/16" cork as a bite plate just to give it a try, which is a removable and seemed the least invasive approach.

Still deciding if it is a keeper.

Cork feels pretty good and at least it is safe and easy to work with.

It is up on Ebay (11/2017).
 
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