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Located a pretty old, beat up baritone sax, Oscar Adler number 1718, small round logo, very odd key configuration, not all normal key place.ent, no bflat, several odd differences. I'm guessing a very early model as I understand they played with key design in the early years.

Horn is rough, mainly grabbing
It for the unique design and age. Anyone else have any ideas on this horn?

Thanks in advance! View attachment 204433 View attachment 204433 View attachment 204449
 

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Located a pretty old, beat up baritone sax, Oscar Adler number 1718, small round logo, very odd key configuration, not all normal key place.ent, no bflat, several odd differences. I'm guessing a very early model as I understand they played with key design in the early years.

Horn is rough, mainly grabbing
It for the unique design and age. Anyone else have any ideas on this horn?
That 40 S&W ought to take care of it. :shock:
 

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first of all there is a very high chance that this horn is in high pitch and before you spend time and money on this specimen, I’d check this, first trying to play at least a few notes against a tuner.

If that is impossible , due to the horn not being in a playable state, check the distance between toneholes, if this is an high pitch horn, as I suspect, it should be shorter than normal distance

Unfortunately, measuring the total length isn’t an easy task on a baritone ( and more so on a short range instrument) because the position of curl can throw your measuring point off ( one can have longer or shorter curls depending on the length of the neck which is also more variable than in other types of saxophones).

In my opinion, even if it wouldn’t be HP, this horn is probably not worth the effort to be fixed.

Considering all the things that are wrong with it anyway (you are also missing a guard I suppose by that low C?) the cost of repair (even if you do this yourself) and the amount of work would simply be disproportionately high compared to its value.

Even as an instrument this is not an antique or even a very special instrument as a very early Adolphe sax would be.


This looks like the many instruments that were made in Europe (sometimes at a surprising late age) for the countless small marching bands and which showed a reduced range , there were such instruments in Italy, France, Belgium, the NL, and probably Germany too.

In My opinion this saxophone is probably made in the ’30 and was made with old features as a money saving production. If it were a late ‘800 instrument it wouldn’t be nickel plated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not planning to fix....just getting it for the unique look...more interested in history, date, and such for conversation !

I have a '69 Buescher 400 baritone I need to rebuild. I do most work myself
 

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The company really still exists under Gebruder Mönnig & Oscar Adler brands

https://www.moennig-adler.de/en/instruments/oboe/oboes/oscar_adler/

[email protected]

So, even though they no longer make saxophones you could ask them to look up their archives.

Alternatively, you could ask the Markneukirchen Museum which should know much more than any of us does about Oskar Adler’s short range baritones.

https://www.museum-markneukirchen.de

[email protected]


Not long ago there was a member who was involved in an exhibition of the German saxophone

Dear all

from 21st. May 2016 till 31st. October 2016

at the

Musikinstrumenten - Museum Markneukirchen / Germany

will take place an exhibition of saxophones manufactured in the german speaking areas from the very beginnings
of saxophone production around 1900 up to today.

Please see the attached flyer:

View attachment 76826

About 100 vintage Saxophones, manufactured by companies like Oscar Adler, Julius Keilwerth, Max Keilwerth,
Kohlert´s Soehne, (Kohlert Sons), G.H.Hueller, F.X.Hueller, Eugen Schuster, Gebrueder Moennig, Franz Koehler,
Karl Hammerschmidt, Hohner AG and many other companies, but also some newer like from B&S, Benedict
Eppelsheim, can be seen. Among them are several rarities like a V.Kohlert Sons quarter tone saxophone
(V.Kohlert´s Soehne Vierteltonsaxophon), a F.X.Hueller contrabass saxophone and Eppelsheim´s Tubax.

Many related documents, photos, advertisings, etc. will be displayed and a bunch of useful information will be
provided as well.

This unique and special exhibition is organized by the well known german collector and author of musical instrument
books Guenter Dullat in corporation with the Musikinstrumenten-Museum Markneukirchen, supported
by several manufacturer of musical instruments and private saxophone collectors from Switzerland and Germany
which provided documents and instruments.

The exhibition will not be shown anywhere else, therefore don`t miss this chance to learn more about the well built
and underrated Saxophones produced in the German speaking countries.

An nice exhibition catalogue, which is highly recommended to all collectors of vintage Saxophones, will be available.
The catalogue will be full of photos, documents, information, explanations and comments.

Background information:

Markneukirchen is more suitable for this exhibition than any other town of Germany. In former times companies like
Oscar Adler, Gebrueder Moenning and others produced saxophones in Markneukirchen. Julius Keilwerth, today
belonging to Buffet Group, is still producing saxophones there.

The small town Markneukirchen is located in the easter part of Germany near to the Czech border. Markneukirchen
is for Germany what´s Elkhart for the USA. The area to which Markneukirchen belongs to is called “Musikwinkel”
which can be translated with "Music Corner". Nearly all kinds of musical instrument were and are still produced in
Markneukirchen or other towns nearby by bigger or smaller manufacturers. Today´s instrument manufacturers of
Markneukichen are famous for their Brass Instruments like Trumpets, Trombones, Horns, Tubas, etc. but also as
well for their woodwind and string instruments.

The town Graslitz, former Austrian home town of J.Keilwerth, V.Kohlert Sons, F.X.Hueller, is located very close to
Markneukirchen. Graslitz (Kraslice) now belongs to the Czech Republic. The czech company Amati is still producing
musical instruments at Graslitz.


Address and Homepage of the museum:

Musikinstrumenten - Museum Markneukirchen
Bienengarten 2
D-08258 Markneukirchen / Germany
email: [email protected]

http://www.museum-markneukirchen.de/start.html
Dear all,

I just want to let you know......

meanwhile the catalogue of the Saxophone Exhibition Markneukirchen 2016 is available.

It is a really fantastic book with great photos, prints and a lot of useful information concerning
saxophone making in German speaking regions. A lot of questions will be answered. It´s a must
have for the saxophone collector. The catalogue is written in german and english language.


Please have a look to this link:

http://www.museum-markneukirchen.de/FaszinationSaxophon.html

The catalogue can be ordered via email: [email protected]
 

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Interesting.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Exactly what it will be...a conversation piece..
.I just like the uniquness of it, the age and the look. It does not have a traditional b flat key...only three lh pinky keys, lots of oddities! Now to get it bought cheap. His grandmother wants to sell it, it was a gift to his grandpa back years ago. The grandson agrees with me, not much value....we shall see!
 

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frankly speaking , being a saxophone with the sole value of being a decoration item, this is worth $50 or thereabouts.

if you restore it, it will be labour of love but it will cost you a bit of money and a lot of time. As for uniqueness, the fact that you haven’t seen any before , has really more to do with the fact that these short range saxophones which carried out into the 20th century were mostly a European phenomenon. Their “ rarity” is mostly due to the fact that because they were not desirable they were all scrapped long ago.

But you are not the first person whom, against all odds or advise, goes on to restore a sax of little value and historical significance simply because you fell in love with it.

So, have fun!

Similar short range baritones are often out there (I see them regularly) look at this Couesnon for sale in the NL.

I don’t understand the high offers for this which is incomparably better state!


 
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