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S: SA II. A+T: Martin HC1 T: Mark VI A:39 King Zephyr B: Martin HC imperial
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Funny thing is that they claim there horns will last a “lifetime”. Little did any of these manufacturers realize it was probably two lifetimes.
 

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Tenor, alto, Bb Clarinet, Flute
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This is great. I used to have the original care guide for my Buffet clarinet but lost it somehow. D’oh!


Properly cared for any instrument can last almost indefinitely. I’ve mentioned here before I have a 190 year old clarinet in remarkably good shape (after I had some missing parts fabricated). I expect it could easily last another 100 years if taken care of in our exceptionally dry western US climate.
 

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Some beautiful ephemera. Thanks for sharing. Not often you find paperwork that is in mint condition. Is the Saxophone equally as nice?
 

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I’ve got to find some Martin Micromajic Key Oil and give my Indiana a little love!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
alto: 82Zii/Medusa/Supreme, tenor: Medusa, bari: b-901, sop, sc-990
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"Mouthpipe", unusual word.

"Martinamel", perhaps indicating they used some enamel in their lacquer.

I like that they mentioned the women at the Martin company.



from the internet:

Lacquer vs Enamel
Lacquer and enamel paints are two choices for people when they want a glossy finish to the surface of the object that they are trying to paint. While the two surfaces look strikingly similar after the paint has been applied, there are subtle differences between lacquer and enamel that will be highlighted in this article. Paint component in both types of paints remain the same, and the basic difference lies in the solvents used in the two paints. Let us take a closer look at enamel paint and lacquer paint.

Enamel Paint
Enamel paint has a paint that dries to leave behind a glossy finish. This is a paint that is mostly used on walls and metallic surfaces where a glossy finish is required. While, in automobiles, enamel paints are a necessity, they are also used in homes, in places where there is a lot of moisture and water is used that can affect the surface of the paint. Thus, enamel paints are used in kitchens and bathrooms, to preserve the paint on the walls. Outdoor structures that are exposed to elements are often painted using enamel paints. Enamel paints take time to dry out and prove to be very durable.

Lacquer Paint
Lacquer paints are paints that utilize lacquer to serve the purpose of thinner. Lacquer paint produces a very glossy transparent finish that is shiny and looks very attractive. However, this paint has the tendency to crack and also develop bubbles in a short time if it is not applied by professional painters. These paints also dry up very quickly which is why they are applied using a sprayer.

Between 1920s and 1960s lacquer paint used to be very popular, and it was applied on automobile bodies and furniture as it produced an attractive glossy finish. Lacquer paints are labeled soft, and they need several coats to be applied. They are still not very durable. One can find these paints in the form of spray guns and containers.

Lacquer vs Enamel

• The difference between enamel and lacquer paints lies in their solvents. While enamel paints make use of spirits, there is lacquer to serve the purpose of the thinner, in lacquer paints.

• Lacquer paints soften over a period of time, whereas enamel paints remain hard for a long time.

• Lacquer paints develop bubbles if not applied by professionals. This is not the case with enamel paints.

• Lacquer paints were very popular in between 1920 and 1960 when they were used to cover automobile bodies.

• Enamel paints are harder to dry whereas lacquer paints dry up quickly.

• Enamel paints are cheaper than lacquer paints.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think it's just a marketing name to connote durability. It is quite thick, but it's just nitrocellulose.

Ironically, "Martinamel" is well known to be exceptionally delicate compared to other brands of the time.
 

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Wow, neat. Is there an archive of these anywhere? It would be neat to read about my horn. I recently found the info for my Yamaha student horn, but it's only from the late 90s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Saxophone.org has copies of vintage publications from the major saxophone makers. I don't remember seeing this kind of stuff though. It's mostly old catalogues, price lists and advertising.
 

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T880, YTS-82Z; B991; 'Crat 1 alto
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"Mouthpipe", unusual word.
I too found it odd when I saw that Yanagisawa packaging on its aftermarket/replacement necks also refers to it as a “Mouthpipe.” I thought it was maybe just a translation thing, but with seeing this it seems as if it was, at least at one time, a normal term for a neck.

And now further confirmation, using an online dictionary:
Definition of mouthpipe
1: an organ flue pipe
2: the section of a musical wind instrument into which the mouthpiece is inserted

So perhaps, not so much as unusual in the context of the Martin care instructions as out of current standard use.
 

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The warranty has expired.
 

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T880, YTS-82Z; B991; 'Crat 1 alto
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“I’ve been trying to reach you about your saxophone’s warranty, which is about to expire. You haven’t extended your warranty past the factory cut off, and we’re going to close your file soon if you don’t respond. Press 2 if you’re interested in renewing your warranty, or press a 9 if you want to be removed from our list.”
 

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"Martinamel", perhaps indicating they used some enamel in their lacquer…
The brochure also says “Martinamel lacquer” and “Finest of Lacquered Finishes”.

In my experience, enamels are opaque; lacquer is transparent unless loaded with a filler.
 
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