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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I'm a complete beginner in the soprano saxophone area so I'm hoping you guys can help me out!
I'm looking for a soprano saxophone to fool around with, no serious playing but at the same time I dont want it to sound like a pig screaming when blowing my horn.

So after looking around on the internet I found this Thomann TSS-350 soprano, EXTREMELY cheap and I found a video of some guy playing it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGi-_zLfwjw and thought that it sounded ok.

I also found this thread; http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...na-made-sopranos-Bauhaus-Walstein-and-Thomann
Sure, he prefers the Bauhaus, but it costs alot more (at least where I live) and he doesnt seem to be completely unsatisfied with the TSS-350.

So guys, what do you think, is the TSS-350 something for me? Yes? No? Why not?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
And also, what's a good mouthpiece to go with the TSS-350? The guy in the video is using a Claude Lakey 6*. Worth getting even though Im a beginner?
 

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knappt: As I have said in the other thread, I consider the TSS-350 a decent horn for the price, but I'd rather recommend a Bauhaus Walstein Deluxe (AI). While the two saxes look almost identical (except for the engraving), a lot of tiny details (from pads to body finish to point screws) are not. The BW represents tremendous value for the money, the TSS-350 is cheaper, but not as well balanced for the price (I actually think the BW is the better buy, especially if you're a beginner!). If your budget is limited, though, the TSS-350 can get you started, no question about it. The BW will get you started even better AND is a keeper, no matter where you'll be headed later on.

As for the mouthpiece: The 6* will most probably be too open. I'd rather start with a cheap Yamaha or Rico piece, a 4C Yamaha or B3 (or B5 at the most) Rico. I own a B5 - really solid piece for the price and easy to play, but for a real beginner, the B3 will be better. The Yamaha is even more neutral in sound and very reliable in quality - not my cup of tea, but many people swear by it, and I do see why (you know what you get, and it works).

If you buy an additional mouthpiece, make sure to get a decent ligature, too (a standard two screw will do - don't pay too much money, that's something to hold back till later...). I think the Yamaha comes with ligature and cap, but I'm not sure. The Rico comes without.

M.
 

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knappt: As I have said in the other thread, I consider the TSS-350 a decent horn for the price, but I'd rather recommend a Bauhaus Walstein Deluxe (AI).
Me too, not just because of the quality of the horn and setup, but the after sales service you get. I have had a rather sad experience with Thomann.
 

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Well, my experience with Thomann is a bit mixed, but mostly positive - I once had to return an instrument because it was damaged, and they were very gracious about it, no hassle whatsoever. I wouldn't recommend buying reeds from them, though... Anyhow, the TSS-350 I got was absolutely decent, the arrival was quick, the set-up usable, if not prefect (I had a tech look at it - some small leaks to fix, nothing worse). Living in Switzerland prevented my BW acquisition from being similarily smooth (customs sat on the horn for about ten days - *arf*), but dealing with Woodwind&Brass was a pleasure, and the horn played great right out of the box. So if money isn't totally tight, the Bauhaus Walstein (especially the AI!) is the way to go if you want to be pleased by what you get.

M.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advices! The Bauhaus sounds great. But I'm afraid money is a bit tight. And from what I understand from your post its still a _decent_ horn for the money ( 299 eur!) I think Ill take my chances with the Tss-350, worst case scenario; I have to send it back.

Okey, so the 6* is to big you say? My goal is to get a dark, soft, round sound on the saxophone, would you recommend the rico 5 for that? From what i have understand; the bigger mouthpiece, the harder to play but if you can handle it, the bigger and richer tone, have I understood this correct?


One question though: if I buy the http://www.thomann.de/se/thomann_tss350_sopran_saxophone.htm do you know if the ligature in the pictures is included? And if it is, can I use that ligature on, lets say a rico piece?

(sorry for my bad english, hope I made myself clear!)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the advices! The Bauhaus sounds great. But I'm afraid money is a bit tight. And from what I understand from your post its still a _decent_ horn for the money ( 299 eur!) I think Ill take my chances with the Tss-350, worst case scenario; I have to send it back.

Okey, so the 6* is to big you say? My goal is to get a dark, soft, round sound on the saxophone, would you recommend the rico 5 for that?


One question though: if I buy the http://www.thomann.de/se/thomann_tss350_sopran_saxophone.htm do you know if the ligature in the pictures is included? And if it is, can I use that ligature on, lets say a rico piece?

(sorry for my bad english, hope I made myself clear!)
I can answer myself on this question if anyone reading this thread is wondering; yes the ligature that comes with the TSS-350 is a standard size ligature and fits most of the regular plastic or rubber mouthpiece according to Thomann.de support!
 

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knappt: With the right reed for your chops (beginner or otherwise), I'm betting the Lakey would work, although the Yamaha 4C may be a better choice. I have Lakey soprano and clarinet mouthpieces and for me the sopranos are very warm and very spread. I don't like them on soprano (love 'em on clarinet, though).

But mouthpiece recommendations are really subjective because we all react differently and have different embouchures and tonal goals. In MY opinion, reed choices are even more critical than the mouthpiece. One can almost achieve the same results whether the piece has a very closed tip or it has an open tip as long as the right reed is used. DAVE
 
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