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These are good baris. Easy to get in over your head on a bari that needs a lot of work.

The silver is interesting. It should shine up and be pretty nice too.


dsm
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
These are good baris. Easy to get in over your head on a bari that needs a lot of work.

The silver is interesting. It should shine up and be pretty nice too.


dsm
Gent just told me he played it LAST year for a BROADWAY play, so it is PLAYABLE. Yes that Silver Plating thing had me wondering if they came that way, been trying to find info. I also wanted to see where on the horn it says YANI. Will request more pics...What would be a fair offer? He states for me to make him an offer.
 

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I really don’t think that the cosmetics of where this horn is now has too much impact of where it will be oce it has been in the hands of a great restorer. And, man, does this horn need a restorer!




HOWEVER

the total of the buying price and the restoration could probably exceed the price of a similar Baritone that needs absolutely NO work at all.
 

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Was wondering if this YANI is worth buying....NOT at 2 Grand, but perhaps at say 1300-1500? I would assume a complete OVERHAUL would run me about 1500-1800. Thanks in advance, i ask because it is LOCAL to me and was considering making an offer,

https://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/msg/d/yanagisawa-baritone-sax/6685915964.html
If structurally sound and has multiple Yanagisawa logos on it, I would take a chance at $1K-$1.3K. I wouldn't get the horn overhauled in NYC area and pay what you referenced though. I use Les Arbuckle in Carlsbad CA and he would probably charge around $1K or slightly less, depending on how much mechanical work is required beyond pads, felts and corks. I'm sure there are good techs closer by that would charge you less than $1500-$1800.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Love you all for the responses, i was thinking the same in terms of offer...1300 or so...As for overhaul i was thinking more in the line of www.stohrermusic.com (Matt Stohrer) who i know does INCREDIBLE work and will make the horn look like new when finished. I have to agree with you MILANDRO, for the total amount
of price and restoration i could get something that needs NOTHING. Lets see what the seller wants for it and how it plays, i have asked for more pics.....Waiting. Thank you all. My thoughts are........TOTAL 3 Grand...meaning price AND restoration total, i have a pretty nice LOW A BARI from the late 70'S. But we will see.
 

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I suppose much depends on what the level of restoration that one wants to achieve would be, which brings us back to the definition of the word “ overhaul” ( which has never been found in an univocal way).

A simple functional overhaul; would cost many times less than one which would address all the aesthetic issues that, clearly, this horn has.

In the hands of a fastidious technician the restoration of this horn would take an incredible amount of time and cost a lot of money (really a lot!). I also know a “ functionalist” over here, who would just give it a clean up and change all the pads and give it the word " go “ at €500.

It’s all in the definition of overhaul and final expectations. Let alone the pads and other things that you may want to change on this horn.
 

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Didn't Les move back to Beantown? Anyway I'm sure the horn looks worse than it is, and after a disassembly and acid dip it will be more visually appealing. Its probably as cruddy on the inside as it is on the outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Didn't Les move back to Beantown? Anyway I'm sure the horn looks worse than it is, and after a disassembly and acid dip it will be more visually appealing. Its probably as cruddy on the inside as it is on the outside.
HAHAHHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHH, Probably true. lolololololol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I suppose much depends on what the level of restoration that one wants to achieve would be, which brings us back to the definition of the word “ overhaul” ( which has never been found in an univocal way).

A simple functional overhaul; would cost many times less than one which would address all the aesthetic issues that, clearly, this horn has.

In the hands of a fastidious technician the restoration of this horn would take an incredible amount of time and cost a lot of money (really a lot!). I also know a “ functionalist” over here, who would just give it a clean up and change all the pads and give it the word " go “ at €500.

It’s all in the definition of overhaul and final expectations. Let alone the pads and other things that you may want to change on this horn.
I live in the US. Thanks.
 

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Didn't Les move back to Beantown? Anyway I'm sure the horn looks worse than it is, and after a disassembly and acid dip it will be more visually appealing. Its probably as cruddy on the inside as it is on the outside.
Just texted Les and he is still in Carlsbad. Sorry Boston!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
no,thats after market.just like the silver-plated bell-bow and neck.
these are great horns.
good luck.
AH, didn't know that was AFTERMARKET, makes sense why i cant find info on it. lolololol. Would you happen to know who would have done this aftermarket work and why? Makes me wonder now, what makes them such great horns if each after market was done by different people? Or was it done after market by YANI? Thanks for ALL your help. Im still waiting for more pics from the gent and a response to an offer.
 

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If structurally sound and has multiple Yanagisawa logos on it, I would take a chance at $1K-$1.3K. I wouldn't get the horn overhauled in NYC area and pay what you referenced though. I use Les Arbuckle in Carlsbad CA and he would probably charge around $1K or slightly less, depending on how much mechanical work is required beyond pads, felts and corks. I'm sure there are good techs closer by that would charge you less than $1500-$1800.
The guy said he played it on a show last year. Baris don’t get all the wet issues like other horns. What, $300 or $400 to ship to Cali and back and get thrown around by UPS?
Maybe an East Coast price at $2000 but if it increases your work options, it’s worth it.
 

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The guy said he played it on a show last year. Baris don’t get all the wet issues like other horns. What, $300 or $400 to ship to Cali and back and get thrown around by UPS?
Maybe an East Coast price at $2000 but if it increases your work options, it’s worth it.
Not suggesting shipping back and forth, just that there are lower cost options for quality work, some likely nearby as well.😎
 

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neither was I suggesting to ship the horn to the NL!

I was merely saying that some tech who would only barely clean it and repadd it would charge little but would not tackle the elephant in the room.

I am not familiar with the use of the expression aftermarket being used as in “ custom modification” . I have always heard as in a part acquired after the purchase and added to the instrument.

I am aware of where you buy necks, but I am not aware of where you buy a silverplated baritone bell.

For what I can see from the pictures the bell shows signs of having being "patinated “ (for lack of a better word) and you can still see the hue of brass under the patination.

From where I am sitting this looks like a heavily worn-ou horn that was manhandled ( botched) into some sort of patination but the “ work” can hardly have been done by a professional shop.
 

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I think you’re onto something Milandro. Would be odd indeed to disassemble a horn to the point of removing the bell and bow for plating. More likely lacquer was stripped from the bell and bow and something applied to provide a patina as you suggested, though appearance is very like many old silver plated horns I’ve owned that had sat in a case for many years. By the way, those cleaned up nicely and looked like new after polishing. A little silver polish would tell you right away if silver plated.
 

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you can clearly see the brass showing under this home grown (botched) “ patination”. This is not silver, this is an very mistreated bell (liek the rest of the horn) which at some point someone has tried to “ improve “ after it was scratched and lost all its lacquer from use and neglect.





 

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I see what you mean with the bits of lacquer showing through. There you have it!
 
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