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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Can't tell about the pads from the available pictures, but you're correct to assume it will need some, if not a full repad.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Looks pretty good. The nickel finish would be the downside but the pads on the bell section look OK. Assuming not needing a lot of work, you should be OK.
 

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Did you ask the seller any questions, or get a detailed description? Though high pitched Chu's are pretty rare, you at least needed to rule that out (by confirming the letter L as opposed to H under the serial number).
 

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Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
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whatever little pads are visible they seem to be " fresh" (and not original) but that means absolutely nothing when it comes to the horn closing perfectly and it might need adjustment. Always assume that you would need some work done and hope for the best and maybe , just maybe, you could be lucky. Having said that it looks nice enough .
 

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The cork is there to disable the Eb trill key; also commonly referred to as the fork Eb mechanism. Basically, on older saxophones there was an added Eb tone hole and alternate fingering to better facilitate playing Eb trills. To get the alternate Eb, you simply play D and lift the middle finger of your right hand which opens up the alternate Eb tone hole. As trills sort of fell out of favor, manufacturers stopped building horns with it (along with that pesky G# trill key between the F and E keys). Some folks disable the mechanism by reversing the spring, wedging in a cork to shut the pad (like you saw) or even sealing the tone hole in a more permanent fashion. Those who disable it argue that it is one more spot to develop a leak and can be hard to regulate. Of course purists like it to remain functional, and some argue that disabling it can affect intonation of surrounding notes. On the four horns of mine that have it, two are disabled and two are functioning. So I guess I'm in the middle of the road on the issue.
 
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